genealogy

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ge·ne·al·o·gy

(jē'nē-al'ŏ-jē),
1. Heredity.
2. The explicit assembly of the descent of a person or family; it may be of any length.
[G. genea, descent, + logos, study]

genealogy

(jē′nē-ŏl′ə-jē, -ăl′-, jĕn′ē-)
n. pl. genealo·gies
1. A record or table of the descent of a person, family, or group from an ancestor or ancestors; a family tree.
2. Direct descent from an ancestor; lineage or pedigree.
3. The study or investigation of ancestry and family histories.

ge′ne·a·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
ge′ne·a·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ge′ne·al′o·gist n.

ge·ne·al·o·gy

(jē'nē-ol'ŏ-jē)
1. Heredity.
2. The explicit assembly of the descent of a person or family; it may be of any length.
[G. genea, descent, + logos, study]

genealogy

The study of the ancestry of an individual or group. Such investigations are particularly important in tracing the inheritance of genetically transmitted conditions or traits. One of the most important collections of genealogical information is in the archives of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (i.e., the Mormon Church) in Salt Lake City, Utah.
References in periodicals archive ?
Accordingly, the 'geneaology' of his subtitle has to be read in the Foucauldian sense, which is the exact opposite of the dictionary's: not a narrative plotting of cause and effect, but a fugitive skipping from one 'discursive site' to another according to whim.
This seems a curious ancestry for scholarship to accord it: so shallow a geneaology only emphasized the field's insecurity, threatening it with absorption into more established academic empires.
The American evasion of philosophy: A geneaology of pragmatism.
In this geneaology series, The One Show's Alex Jones and a team of experts use the technology to help people uncover secrets in their past.
The book contains a chapter outlining the history of am chi medicine in Hanu based largely on local memory, and provides a geneaology of the main lineages of practitioners, as well as short biographies of the am chi practicing at the time of the research.
Arshin Adib-Moghaddam, The International Politics of the Persian Gulf: A Cultural Geneaology, London, Routledge, 2006.
She found the whole process fascinating and is now supporting a new programme at Woodhorn, which runs for the whole of this month, aimed at getting more people involved in geneaology.
She then turns to the tradition of geneaology, focusing primarily on its articulation by Friedrich Nietzsche and its uses in the works of Michel Foucault.
A truly captivating account and a very welcome contribution to Judaic studies as well as genetic and geneaology reference shelves.
Your family may also enjoy studying your family history at geneaology workshops at The National Underground Railroad Family Reunion Festival held in Philadelphia, June 27-29.