DNA sequencing

(redirected from Gene sequencer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

DNA sequencing

n.
The determination of the sequence of nucleotides in a sample of DNA.

base-sequence analysis

A generally automated method for determining the order of nucleotide bases in a nucleic acid (DNA or RNA).

DNA sequencing

The determination of the sequence of base pairs in a length of DNA.

DNA sequencing

determination of the order of NUCLEOTIDES in a DNA molecule or part thereof. A number of techniques is available to determine a DNA sequence, for example the chain-terminator DNA sequencing procedure (see DIDEOXYRIBONUCLEOTIDE). Generally such techniques rely on the power of polyacrylamide gels to resolve NUCLEIC ACID molecules that differ in length by only a single nucleotide. Ladders of DNA fragments are formed on the gels following ELECTROPHORESIS. Both manual and automated methods of sequencing are available.
References in periodicals archive ?
One major player, Celera Genomics of Rockville, a subsidiary of PE Corporation, makes a version of the latest gene sequencer. Another major gene patenter, Incyte Pharmaceuticals of Palo Alto, California, has close ties with Amersham Pharmacia, which makes a competing version of the machine.
Jrassic Park, however, it just science fiction, Hood says, despite the fact that Hood's gene sequencers are used in the story (pages 39 and 100 of the paperback).
These diverse data and reagents are being generated by investigators from several different research communities, including geneticists, gene sequencers, gene mappers, cell biologists, developmental biologists, and bioinformatics experts.
The massive effort was enabled through four distinct high efficiency tools: efficient experimental design, targeted restriction enzymes building combinatorial libraries, high throughput automated gene sequencers and computer based informatics.
The substantial progress in the field of molecular biology, including automated gene sequencers, industrial use of the PCR, and results from the Human Genome Project, has yielded microfabricated arrays of specific cDNA or specific oligonucleotide sequences.
Buckler's laboratory looks a bit like a beehive, with seven technicians and students and a postdoctoral molecular biologist busily working at automated gene sequencers. Before he can apply any statistics, each of those 30 genes has to be sequenced--or spelled out base by base--for each of the 100 core lines.
Similarly, they would have said that it is not advisable or necessary to give patents to people who merely put up the money to buy automatic gene sequencers and similar laboratory equipment, the output of which is transcribed into patent applications.