gene probe


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gene probe

The technique of matching a short segment of DNA or RNA with the matching sequence of bases on a chromosome. Use of this method permits identification of the precise area on a chromosome responsible for the genetic abnormality being investigated.
See: gene splicing
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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We thank Matthew Waldor for the SXT and rstR gene probes and Afjal Hossain for secretarial assistance.
Raman techniques under development include multidimensional Raman for the study of molecular dynamics, surface-enhanced Raman gene probes, and the development of standard Raman spectral libraries.
Serious conditions, such as certain cancers, will be identified in early stages using gene probes, while HIV infection may be rapidly detected with inexpensive dipsticks.
Surprisingly, less than one-third of the genes significantly regulated by Gen were in common with [E.sub.2] treatment (268 of 932 gene probes) (Figure 1D).
An in situ hybridization assay, with gene probes specific for detection of TSV, was negative for TSV in challenged cells.
With gene probes and monoclonal antibodies introduced at the meeting, the process would take only a few hours.
Southern analysis was performed by hybridizing [sup.32P]dATP-labeled [alpha]- or [zeta]-globin gene probes to BamHIor BglII-digested genomic DNA.
On gestational day 16, the researchers examined the brain of one fetus from each litter using gene probes and in situ hybridization to obtain a quantitative measurement of gene activity.
The additional advantages of the RT-PCR approach are that this method can be readily applied to both serum and tissue samples and that the sequence of the PCR-amplified segment allows conclusions about the relatedness of the detected virus to existing viruses and the synthesis of specific gene probes for this virus.
Use of gene probes and adhesion tests to characterise Escherichia coli belonging to enteropathogenic serogroups isolated in the United Kingdom.