allele frequency

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allele frequency

A term used in population genetics for the number of copies of a particular allele divided by the number of copies of all alleles at that specific genetic locus in a population of interest. Allele frequency is a measure of a population’s genetic diversity: the higher the allele frequency, the greater the population’s consanguinity.
Allele frequencyclick for a larger image
Fig. 23 Allele frequency . Calculation of allele frequency from genotype frequency.

allele frequency

or

gene frequency

the proportion of a particular ALLELE of a gene in a population, relative to other alleles of the same gene. For example, if a gene has two alleles, A and a , and the frequency of A is 0.6, then the frequency of a will be 1.0 - 0.6 = 0.4. The allele frequency can be calculated from the GENOTYPE FREQUENCY; See Fig. 23 .
References in periodicals archive ?
The gene frequencies of C and T at C105T in black goat were detected 0.698 and 0.302, respectively.
It is not known whether gene frequencies found in the Western Cape are representative of other black populations across the country.
The standard error of gene frequencies was calculated as; where, N is sample size, p is the frequencies of the C allele, q is the frequencies of the T allele, and NCC, NCT and NTT are numbers of CC, CT and TT types, respectively (Vanli et al.
FPP correctly point out that a description of a NS process as a change in gene frequencies says nothing about the causal mechanisms actually giving rise to the diversity of phenotypes.
Topics include: models of population growth, randomly mating populations, inbreeding, the correlation between relatives and assertive mating, properties of a finite population, distribution of gene frequencies in populations, and stochastic properties in the change of gene frequencies.
Dawkins, for example, never proposed that the effects of natural selection were limited to gene frequencies. Nor has he denied the essential role of organisms.
In this context, a human epidemic will be difficult to accurately model until such modifier loci are identified and their gene frequencies in the population can be measured."
Chapter 8 covers gene frequencies, linkage disequilibrium, and the use of association mapping techniques in natural populations.
At the same time, the study of gene frequencies and changing distributions of genetic markers among Native American populations has produced new data on historical settlement and migration patterns, which often challenge the archaeological evidence of early human migrations.
Differences in gene frequencies made it clear that the species of indigobirds are distinct, even though the entire group is unusually similar genetically, Sorenson says.
Second, owing to a variety of causes, the same breeding group might be characterized by different gene frequencies and different traits at different times.
The gene frequencies of these 3 alleles in a typical white population are as follows: allele 1, 0.394; allele 2, 0.529; and allele 3, 0.076.