SPAF

(redirected from Gene Spafford)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

SPAF

Vascular disease A clinical trial–Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation–comparing low-dose aspirin vs anticoagulation with warfarin in preventing stroke and systemic embolism–the 1º events in 150 Pts with A Fib. See Atrial fibrillation, Low-dose aspirin. Cf AFASAK, BAATAF.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Gene Spafford, professor of computer science at Purdue University once said about IT security: "The only truly secure system is one that is powered off, cast in a block of concrete and sealed in a lead-lined room with armed guards -- and even then I have my doubts." It's a pretty dramatic and pessimistic statement.
Gene Spafford of Purdue said key parts of Sony's PlayStation Network ran on Apache servers that "were unpatched and had no firewall installed."
For a solid, basic text on the risks, technologies, and strategies, the O'Reilly book Web Security & Commerce by Simson Garfinkel and Gene Spafford offers a complete overview (almost 500 pages) in a very readable form.
Panel members and topics were: Bill Arms, Chair of the ACM Publications Board (Copyright Policy); Gene Spafford, Purdue University (Infrastructure Robustness and Security); Bob Ellis, ACM SIGGRAPH (Research Funding in Bandwidth Issues); Austin Henderson, ACM SIGCHI (Research Funding -- Interface Issues); Anita Borg, Xerox PARC (Women and Minorities in Science); and Lorrie Cranor, AT&T Labs w Research (Privacy).
It has the list-of-lists, Gene Spafford's newsgroups lists, and a few other collections of information.
''They may have underestimated the complexity when they started on it, which is again not surprising,'' said Purdue University computer science professor Gene Spafford.
Gene Spafford, professor of computer sciences at Purdue University, calls the teaching of hacking and virus writing "a very bad idea, both from the point of view of security and from the point of view of education."
* Infrastructure Robustness and Security: Gene Spafford, Purdue University
Irrespective of the laws, Gene Spafford [4] concludes that computer break-ins are categorically unethical.
It seems appropriate this month to reflect on two now-classical April Fool's Day electronic mail messages: the ground-breaking 1984 message allegedly from Chernenko, and the 1988 message allegedly from Gene Spafford. (Leap years are special?)
Submit ten copies of the full paper to Gene Spafford, Software Engineering Research Center, Dept.