genetically modified food

(redirected from Ge food)
Any food genetically modified to resist or tolerate pesiticides, insects, or viruses, or to decrease spoilage, produce antibodies, decrease fatty acid synthesis, or increase production of certain amino acids
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ge·net·i·cal·ly mod·i·fied food

(jĕ-net'ik-ă-lē mod'i-fīd fūd)
Scientifically altered foodstuffs intended to limit exposure of the plants or animals to disease or spoilage. Concerns about safety and efficacy have been raised worldwide.
Synonym(s): frankenfood.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

genetically modified food

Any crop or agricultural product altered by biological engineering for drought resistance, increased growth, resistance to pests or pesticides, prolonged shelf-life, altered textures or flavors, or other economically or commercially desirable characteristics. Promoters of genetically modified foods point to their improved yields (which may have a beneficial impact on agricultural profits or world hunger). Opponents of genetic modification have raised concerns about its effects on ecosystems, human food allergies, and religious dietary laws.
Synonym: bioengineered food
See also: food
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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China is the largest importer of genetically engineered crops and one of the largest producers of GE cotton in the world, yet it has not approved any major GE food or feed crops for cultivation.
In July 2016, Congress settled this federalism conflict, mandating that the Secretary of Agriculture promulgate federal regulations to govern GE food labeling and preempting state labeling requirements.
(17) Adulterated food is food that "bears or contains any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render it injurious to health." (18) if the FDA ever determined that a GE food may be injurious to health, it would have the authority to regulate that food.
In 2012, the Food and Chemical Toxicology journal published a study that demonstrated that a population of rats that consumed GE food over a period of time was more likely to succumb to tumors and death at a much more aggressive rate than their counterparts in a controlled sample.
The unusually long amount of time it took for the farm-raised fish to go from preliminary to final approval highlighted the level of enmity in the debate over GE food.
The promotion of mandatory GE food ingredient labeling fits very well with the underlying marketing strategy of the organic sector.
Food and Drug Administration to label GE food and foods containing GE ingredients.
However, CAST points out that to date, "no material differences in composition or safety of commercialized GE crops have been identified that would justify a label based on the GE nature of the product." This is true even though "this conclusion will not satisfy those who consider the insertion or manipulation of genes in a laboratory a material difference per se, the science of food safety does not support mandatory process-based labeling of GE food." And neither does the U.S.
Here's a look at what the Seralini study found, why it should not have been retracted, and how to tell the difference between valid and bogus claims about GE food.
* A number of countries already require mandatory labeling: Over 60 countries require the mandatory labeling of GE food, including Australia, China, India, Japan, and the member states of the EU (Label It Wa-I-522, 2013).
Meanwhile, the EU continues to depend on GE food: corn imported from the U.S., soybeans from South America, and animal feed from the U.S., Brazil and Argentina.
North Americans have been eating them for 15 years, whereas Europeans scarcely eat them at all, but there is no significant difference in disease and death rates that can be linked to GE food. Meanwhile crop yields have risen dramatically, herbicide and pesticide use has declined, and no-till farming that cuts carbon dioxide emissions due to ploughing has become far more common.