Gaucher cells

Gauch·er cells

(gō-shā'),
large, finely and uniformly vacuolated cells derived from the reticuloendothelial system, and found especially in the spleen, lymph nodes, liver, and bone marrow of patients with Gaucher disease; Gaucher cells contain kerasin (a cerebroside), which accumulates as a result of a genetically determined absence of the enzyme glucosylceramidase.

Gauch·er cells

(gō-shā' selz)
Large, finely, and uniformly vacuolated cells derived from the reticuloendothelial system and found especially in the spleen, lymph nodes, liver, and bone marrow of patients with Gaucher disease; contain kerasin (a cerebroside), which accumulates as a result of a genetically determined absence of the enzyme glucosylceramidase.

Gaucher,

Philippe Charles Ernest, French physician, 1854-1918.
Gaucher cells - large, finely and uniformly vacuolated cells derived from the reticuloendothelial system and found especially in the spleen, lymph nodes, liver, and bone marrow of patients with Gaucher disease.
Gaucher disease - a lysosomal storage disease. Synonym(s): cerebroside lipidosis; familial splenic anemia
Gaucher type of histiocyte
pseudo-Gaucher cell - a plasma cell, microscopically resembling a Gaucher cell, found in the bone marrow in some cases of multiple myeloma.
References in periodicals archive ?
The patient had been definitively diagnosed with GD at the age of 1 year based on the identification of Gaucher cells in her bone marrow and decreased leukocyte [sz]-glucosidase activity.
5 Cytopenia develops in patients who have undergone splenectomy reflects advanced marrow infiltration by Gaucher cells.
As a result, the accumulation of Gaucher cells may cause spleen and liver enlargement, anemia, excessive bleeding and bruising, bone disease and a number of other signs and symptoms.
The diagnosis was based on anemia, thrombocytopenia, elevated levels of serum acid phosphatase and angiotensin-converting enzyme, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, the presence of Gaucher cells in bone marrow aspiration.
29) Accumulation of immunoglobulin light chains within histiocytes may mimic the appearance of Gaucher cells or of the so-called pseudo-Gaucher cells seen in chronic myelogenous leukemia.
Pulmonary hypertension in Gaucher disease is not common but it is shown to be secondary to interstitial or perivascular infiltration of Gaucher cells or primary in patients exposed to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT).
1,11) In its absence, glucocerebroside remains intact and accumulates to form the characteristic Gaucher cells of the disease.
Bone marrow examination revealed the presence of lipid-engorged macrophages, typical Gaucher cells appeared with “fibrillary crumpled silk” in the cytoplasm and eccentrically placed nucleus.
3) However, the needle-shaped crystalloid nature of the inclusions in CSH can be easily distinguished from the fibrillarity seen in Gaucher cells.
1] Gaucher disease has long been confused with CSH, although Gaucher cells have paler, so-called wrinkled-paper cytoplasm.