gate

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Related to Gates: Bill Gates, Logic gates

gate

 [gāt]
1. an electronic circuit that passes a pulse only when a signal (the gate pulse) is present at a second input.
2. a mechanism for opening or closing a protein channel in a cell membrane, regulated by a signal such as increased concentration of a neurotransmitter, change in electrical potential, or physical binding of a ligand molecule to the protein to cause a conformational change in the protein molecule.
3. to open and close selectively and function as a gate.

gate

(gāt),
1. To close an ion channel by electrical (for example, membrane potential) or chemical (for example, neurotransmitter) action.
See also: cardiac gating.
2. Action of a special nerve fiber to block the transmission of impulses through a synapse, for example, gating of pain impulses at synapses in the dorsal horns.
See also: cardiac gating.
3. A device that can be switched electronically to control the passage of a signal.
See also: cardiac gating.
4. To use a physiologic signal, such as an ECG, to trigger an event such as an x-ray exposure or to partition continuously collected data.
See also: cardiac gating.
[O.E. geat]

gate

[gāt]
1 n, an electronic circuit that passes a pulse only when a signal (the gate pulse) is present at a second input.
2 n, a mechanism for opening or closing a protein channel in a cell membrane, regulated by a signal such as increased concentration of a neurotransmitter, change in electrical potential, or physical binding of a ligand molecule to the protein to cause a conformational change in the protein molecule.
3 v, to open and close selectively and function as a gate.
Cell biology A structure composed of one or more proteins that regulate passage of ions through channels in the cell membrane; gates may be chemically regulated—by neurotransmitters—or voltage regulated—in response to a threshold level of depolarization
Drug slang A regional term for Spanish heroin
Informatics An electronic circuit that performs an operation when the criteria for a logical relation—e.g., AND, or OR—are fulfilled
Immunology verb To limit the size of cells detected and their fluorescence in flow cytometry to increase the purity of cell population being analysed or sorted
Vox populi A new root form derived from the Watergate scandal which toppled the Nixon administration; -gate has been applied to various scandals. Medically-related -gates include AIDSgate and Bloodgate
References in classic literature ?
Early in the day Robin had drawn his men to a point, as near as he dared, in the wood where he could watch the road leading to the East gate.
If I may make so bold, I would not try to enter the city from this gate, as 'tis closely guarded since yesterday.
Not even a single guard was visible before the great entrance gate, nor in the gardens beyond, into which he could see, was there sign of the myriad life that pulses within the precincts of the royal estates of the red jeddaks.
In the few seconds that had been required for the consummation of these rapidly ensuing events, Otobu had dragged Bertha Kircher to the gate which he had unbarred and thrown open, and with the vanquishing of the last of the active guardsmen, the party passed out of the maniac city of Xuja into the outer darkness beyond.
From the open gate of the city of maniacs came the answering cry of a lion.
A great peacock strutted proudly across the walk before them, and, as Richard ran, childlike, after it, Lady Maud hastened on to the little postern gate which she quickly unlocked admitting her lover who had been waiting without.
Meanwhile, standing on the other side of the gate, he calmly put the key in his pocket.
But scarcely had I taken a hundred steps in the direction of the farther gate when the sound of marching troops, the clank of metal, and the squealing of thoats just within the city apprised me of the fact that the Kaolians were already moving toward the other gate.
He slipped underneath the gate, and was safe at last in the wood outside the garden.
Thank ye," said John, "I think you are quite in the right place, and maybe a little scratching will teach you not to leap a pony over a gate that is too high for him," and so with that John rode off.
It was only now, with the day drawing to a close and with them approaching the gate of the road to Berkeley, that he had broached the important subject.
Tellson's Bank, established in the Saint Germain Quarter of Paris, was in a wing of a large house, approached by a courtyard and shut off from the street by a high wall and a strong gate.