gatekeeper

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gate·keep·er

(gāt'kēp-ĕr),
A health care professional, typically a physician or nurse, who has the first encounter with a patient and who thus controls the patient's entry into the health care system.

gatekeeper

a health care professional, usually a primary care physician or a physician extender, who is the patient's first contact with the health care system and triages the patient's further access to the system.
Managed care
(1) A person, organization, or legislation that selectively limits access to a service; in health care, primary-care physicians—e.g., family practitioners, general practitioners, internists, paediatricians and PROs—and utilization review committees, respectively, function as direct or indirect gatekeepers
(2) A physician who manages a patient’s healthcare services, coordinates referrals, and helps control healthcare costs by screening out unnecessary services; many health plans insist on a gatekeeper’s prior approval for special services, in the absence of which the claim will not be covered
Molecular biology The initial gene mutated in a ‘cascade’ of mutations, leading to the development of a disease

gatekeeper

Managed care
1. A person, organization, or legislation that selectively limits access to a service; in health care, primary-care physicians–eg family practitioners, general practitioners, internists, pediatricians and PROs and utilization review committees, respectively, function as direct or indirect gatekeepers.
2. Care coordinator A physician who manages a Pt's healthcare services, coordinates referrals and helps control healthcare costs by screening out unnecessary services; many health plans insist on a gatekeeper's prior approval for special services or the claim will not be covered.

gate·keep·er

(gāt'kēp-ĕr)
A health care professional, typically a physician or nurse, who has the first encounter with a patient and who thus controls the patient's entry into the health care system.

gate·keep·er

(gāt'kēp-ĕr)
A health care professional, typically a physician or nurse, who has the first encounter with a patient and who thus controls patient's entry into system.
References in periodicals archive ?
While big record companies like RCA were once the industry s gate-keepers, today s bands must negotiate a tangled web of cultural paths, from digital distribution of songs to utilizing songs in movies and television to video games.
The latter are being targeted on what is also the opening day of the Beijing Olympics because of China's commercial and diplomatic ties to the generals, gate-keepers of Myanmar's plentiful reserves of natural gas and other resources.
Unnecessary demand could be restricted by introducing standardised electronic patient records, promoting efficient medical practices, as well as through the introduction of gate-keepers and higher copayments where appropriate.
I see our role as being gate-keepers of the city's image.
This client said when she retires she may write an expose on how gate-keepers cost their companies millions of dollars per year.
They borrowed heavily to pay for repairs and for the wages of the gate-keepers, and never fully recouped the cost from customers.
cable tycoon John Malone in control of six of Germany's nine cable franchises, broadcasting groups Kirch and RTL have expressed fear that their channels could be yanked from cable by the new gate-keepers if they so desire.
Charle claims that writers had either to accept these gate-keepers or "double" themselves in order to establish their independence.
Nurses, for their part, are the gate-keepers for the SMARTT Program.
The fewer the resources, the greater the number of gate-keepers and the more they demand to allow you access to even the basics.
as natural gate-keepers for virus-induced sickness behavior, and established a potential target for the treatment of behavioral changes during virus infection or type I interferon therapy.
largely given the role of being the gate-keepers, decision-makers, custodians of family and community virtues, it was imperative to view and engage men and boys as active agents in promoting gender equality and prevention against gender-based violence.