gastrointestinal bleeding

(redirected from Gastrointestinal haemorrhage)

gastrointestinal bleeding

any bleeding from the GI tract. The most common underlying conditions are peptic ulcer, Mallory-Weiss syndrome, esophageal varices, diverticulosis, ulcerative colitis, and carcinoma of the stomach and colon. Vomiting of bright red blood or passage of coffee ground vomitus indicates upper GI bleeding, usually from the esophagus, stomach, or upper duodenum. Aspiration of the gastric contents, lavage, and endoscopy are performed to determine the site and rate of bleeding. Tarry black stools indicate a bleeding source in the upper GI tract; bright red blood from the rectum usually indicates bleeding in the distal colon. GI bleeding is treated as a potential emergency. Patients may require transfusions, fluid replacement, endoscopic treatment, or gastric lavage and are watched carefully so as to prevent shock and hypovolemia. In all patients blood loss is evaluated and ability to coagulate is tested. See also coffee-ground vomitus, hematochezia, melena.

gastrointestinal bleeding

Any hemorrhage into the GI tract lumen, from esophagus–eg, from ruptured esophageal varices, to anus–eg from hemorrhoids

gastrointestinal bleeding

Bleeding from anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract.
Synonym: gastrointestinal hemorrhage
See also: bleeding
References in periodicals archive ?
Modern-day management of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage.
Factors Affecting Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage, Results of Chi-Squared Test
8 From a coastal region of India, a study of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage reports a very high M:F ratio of 6:1.
Risk of gastrointestinal haemorrhage with calcium antagonists in hypertensive persons over 67 years old.
However, chelators cause significant toxicity, including kidney failure, liver failure or gastrointestinal haemorrhage.
Objectives: To compare the efficacy of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles with microcoils in angiembolisation of non variceal acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage.
There were 1,320 deaths reported which resulted in a new boxed warning about gastrointestinal haemorrhage as well as kidney and liver failure.
Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage has a variety of causes (Table 1) and is the commonest complication of peptic ulceration and portal hypertension.
In this study we included consecutive 113 patients who presented to gastroenterology department with upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage with cirrhosis liver, who were admitted to this department from April 2011 to August 2012 with upper G.
Only cases of life threatening or massive gastrointestinal haemorrhage were included.
It was a gastrointestinal haemorrhage and blood loss which caused his death.

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