abdominal angina

(redirected from Gastrointestinal Ischemia)

ab·dom·i·nal an·gi·na

, angina abdominis
intermittent abdominal pain, frequently occurring at a fixed time after eating, caused by inadequacy of the mesenteric circulation resulting from arteriosclerosis or other arterial disease.
Synonym(s): intestinal angina

abdominal angina

n.
Intermittent abdominal pain, frequently occurring at a fixed time after eating, caused by inadequacy of the mesenteric circulation.
A condition characterised by intermittent severe ischaemia, resulting in abdominal colic, beginning 15–30 mins post-prandially, lasting 1–2 hours, and appearing when 2 or all 3—superior and inferior mesenteric and celiac—major abdominal arteries have severe atherosclerosis; because the intestine’s O2 demand increases with meals, patients avoid the pain by not eating, and thus lose weight; malabsorption may occur since absorption is O2-dependent
Management Bypass, endarterectomy, vascular reimplantation, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

abdominal angina

Chronic mesenteric ischemia, see there.

ab·dom·i·nal an·gi·na

, angina abdominis (ab-dom'i-năl an'ji-nă, an'ji-nă ab-dō'mi-nis)
Intermittent abdominal pain, frequently occurring at a fixed time after eating, caused by inadequacy of the mesenteric circulation resulting from arteriosclerosis or other arterial disease, with associated significant weight loss.
Synonym(s): intestinal angina.

ab·dom·i·nal an·gi·na

, angina abdominis (ab-dom'i-năl an'ji-nă, an'ji-nă ab-dō'mi-nis)
Intermittent abdominal pain, frequently occurring at a fixed time after eating, caused by inadequate mesenteric circulation.
Synonym(s): intestinal angina.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is believed that the first reported case of gastrointestinal ischemia associated with the use of hormonal contraceptive agents was published in 1963 by Reed and Coon.
Although relatively rare, gastrointestinal ischemia can be a serious and costly complication resulting in profound morbidity and even death in women taking hormonal contraceptive products.
It was speculated that this delayed increase was attributable to skeletal muscle ischemia or the occurrence of gastrointestinal ischemia (12).
None of the patients who were followed up showed evidence of gastrointestinal neoplasm or recurrence of gastrointestinal ischemia (Table 1).
For the newborn and infant, blood in the stool may be indicative of a minor problem, such as anorectal fissures, or of a more serious gastrointestinal ischemia (Fanaroff & Martin, 1983; Silber, 1990).
Skeletal muscle and gastrointestinal ischemia was implicated as a cause of such delayed increases in IMA values.
Increased concentrations of IMA have been demonstrated 24-48 h after endurance exercise and have been postulated to relate to delayed gastrointestinal ischemia (20).
We hypothesize that the increase in the ACB test values 24-48 h postrace were not of myocardial origin, but could be attributed to either gastrointestinal ischemia (9) or skeletal muscle ischemia (2), which occur during long-distance running.

Full browser ?