Gardnerella vaginalis


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Gard·ner·el·la va·gi·na·lis

a species that is an etiologic agent of bacterial vaginosis in humans.

Gard·ner·el·la va·gi·na·lis

(gahrd-nĕr-el'ă vaj-i-nā'lis)
A species that is a contributor to bacterial vaginosis.

Gardnerella vaginalis

An organism commonly infecting the vagina and giving rise to an irritating vaginal inflammation with a thin discharge having a fishy odour when in contact with alkali (‘whiff test’). The organism is transmitted sexually and the condition is treated with metronidazole.
References in periodicals archive ?
In about 50% of asymptomatic women, culture results are positive for flora such as Gardnerella vaginalis. (5) While Amsel's criteria are often used as a reference and generally suffice for the evaluation of symptomatic women, the best candidate for a gold standard test is probably Gram stain assessment using Nugent's criteria (described in this section).
The common organisms causing Leucorrhoea are Candida albicans, Trichomonas vaginalis and Gardnerella vaginalis. (2)
Activation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 expression by Gardnerella vaginalis. J Infect Dis.
Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, and Prevotella and Lactobacillus species made up 81% of the isolates.
Bacterial vaginosis represents disruption of the vaginal flora, with overgrowth of anaerobic and facultative organisms such as Gardnerella vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, Atopobium vaginae, and other species.
Gram negatives will overgrow, and Gardnerella vaginalis is inhibited.
genitalium (13), herpes simplex viruses (HSV-1 and -2), Trichomonas vaginalis, Ureaplasma urealyticum and parvum, Gardnerella vaginalis, and adenoviruses (12).
When those levels become unbalanced, the normal flora may be overgrown by anaerobic microorganisms (non-oxygen dependent organisms), mycoplasmas and Gardnerella vaginalis. The result is a low-grade infection that often produces an abnormal vaginal discharge.
"Gardnerella vaginalis is not really attacked by metronidazole," he said.
Gardnerella vaginalis infection, or bacterial vaginosis, has been suggested in a number of studies as a cofactor for the development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and as being associated with an increased relative risk of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.
Bacterial Vaginosis [BV] is the most common variety of vaginal infection in which the normal predominant vaginal flora Lactobacillus is replaced with Gardnerella vaginalis, anaerobic bacteria and Mycoplasma hominis.