Gardnerella


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Gardnerella

 [gahrd″ner-el´ah]
a genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria having one species, G. vagina´lis (formerly called Haemophilus vaginalis). It is found in the normal female genital tract and is the causative organism for nonspecific vaginitis. Gardnerella infection is one of the most common and most contagious of the sexually transmitted diseases and is thought to be in association with infections by anaerobic organisms. The major symptom is increased vaginal discharge that is thin and gray, has a fishy odor, and has a pH between 5 and 5.5. There usually is no itching or sign of mucosal irritation since the organism does not invade the vaginal mucosa; if such symptoms do occur, it suggests that a concomitant infection is present. Treatment is with metronidazole (Flagyl). The sexual partner should be treated concurrently if reinfection is to be avoided.

Gardnerella

(gărd'nĕr-el'ă),
A genus of facultatively anaerobic, oxidase- and catalase-negative, non-spore-forming, nonencapsulated, nonmotile, pleomorphic bacteria with gram-variable rods.

Gard·ner·el·la

(gahrd-nĕr-el'ă)
A genus of facultatively anaerobic, oxidase- and catalase-negative, non-spore-forming, nonencapsulated, nonmotile, pleomorphic bacteria with gram-variable rods.
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysis of adherence, biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity suggest a greater virulence potential of Gardnerella vaginalis relative to other bacterial vaginosis associated anaerobes.
Bacteria Sexually transmitted: Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonnorhoea, Trichomonas vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vagiane, Bacteroides fragilis, Prevotella bivia, Mobiluncus mulieris, Molbiluncus curtisii, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Ureaplasma parvum etc.
Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, and Prevotella and Lactobacillus species made up 81% of the isolates.
Bacterial vaginosis represents disruption of the vaginal flora, with overgrowth of anaerobic and facultative organisms such as Gardnerella vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, Atopobium vaginae, and other species.
Bacterial vaginosis (BV) results when the Lactobacilli bacteria that colonize the vaginal area are outcompeted by other bacteria such as Gardnerella species.
Comparison of microscopic and cultural findings in the diagnosis of Gardnerella vaginalis infection.
Amniotic fluid cultures from pregnancies complicated by chorioamnionitis have shown multiple organisms from the vaginal flora, such as Streptococcus agalactiae, Gardnerella vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, anaerobes, and E.
When those levels become unbalanced, the normal flora may be overgrown by anaerobic microorganisms (non-oxygen dependent organisms), mycoplasmas and Gardnerella vaginalis.
Gardnerella vaginalis infection, or bacterial vaginosis, has been suggested in a number of studies as a cofactor for the development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and as being associated with an increased relative risk of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.
coli, Candida albicans, Gardnerella vaginales, enterococci, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Lactobacillus spp.
1) It is an imbalance in the ecology of the normal vaginal flora that is characterized by the depletion of lactobacilli and the proliferation of anaerobic bacteria such as Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus species, Prevotella species, Mycoplasma hominis and the recently identified Atopobium vaginae.