Gardner syndrome


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Gard·ner syn·drome

(gard'nĕr), [MIM*175100-0006]
multiple polyposis predisposing to carcinoma of the colon; also multiple tumors, osteomas of the skull, epidermoid cysts, and fibromas; autosomal dominant inheritance, caused by mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC) on chromosome 5q. This disorder is allelic to familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP).

Gardner syndrome

Genetics An AD condition characterized by multiple–100s to 1000s of premalignant polyps of the large intestine; carcinoma may develop in the teens in the Pts

Gard·ner syn·drome

(gahrd'nĕr sin'drōm)
Multiple polyposis predisposing to carcinoma of the colon; also multiple tumors, osteomas of the skull, epidermoid cysts, and fibromas; autosomal dominant inheritance, caused by mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC) on chromosome 5q. This disorder is allelic to familial adenomatous polyposis.

Gardner,

Eldon John, U.S. geneticist, 1909-1987.
Fitzgerald-Gardner syndrome - see under Fitzgerald
Gardner syndrome - multiple polyposis predisposing to carcinoma of the colon.

Gardner,

W.J., U.S. physician.
Gardner syndrome - bilateral acoustic nerve neuromas resulting in progressive loss of hearing and neurologic complications; may result in tumors of the brain, colon, skin, pancreas, skeleton, thyroid, or mandible.

Gard·ner syn·drome

(gahrd'nĕr sin'drōm) [MIM*175100-0006]
Multiple polyposis predisposing to carcinoma of the colon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Benign osteoma with Gardner syndrome; review of the literature and report of a case.
This condition is most often associated with carcinoma of the lower gastrointestinal tract, "although the tumors tend to be less aggressive than they are with Gardner syndrome," Dr.
Gardner Syndrome Gardner syndrome is characterized by a triad of alterations that include multiple osteomas, soft tissue lesions such as epidermoid cysts and fibromas of the skin, and multiple polyposis of the large intestines.
It is an advocacy group for families who have any one of the inherited forms of colon cancer, which include familial adenomatous polyposis or Gardner syndrome (FAP/GS), juvenile polyposis (JP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC/Lynch syndrome) and Turcot syndrome.
All patients with a recognized diagnosis of Gardner syndrome were excluded.
Multiple lesions have occurred in association with myotonic dystrophy, Gardner syndrome, Turner syndrome, Steinert disease, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome and sarcoidosis.
(7) Multiple lesions are rare, seen in 2 to 10% of patients, and have been associated with Gardner syndrome, Steinert disease (also known as myotonic dystrophy), and sarcoidosis.
(3) Although as a rule, pilomatrixoma is not hereditary, a few instances of familial occurrence has been reported and in some of the cases the tumour may be associated with myotonic dystrophy, gardner syndrome. Rapid enlargement of pilomatrixoma may occur as a result of hematoma formation.