ginger

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gin·ger

(jin'jĕr),
The dried rhizome of Zingiber officinale (family Zingiberaceae), known in commerce as Jamaica ginger, African ginger, and Cochin ginger The outer cortical layers are often either partially or completely removed; used as a carminative and flavoring agent.
Synonym(s): zingiber

ginger

A deciduous plant rich in volatile oil, with borneol, camphene, cineol, citral, gingerols, shogaols, zingerones (phenylalkylketones) and phelandrene.
 
Alternative nutrition
Ginger has a long tradition as a health food, and its various uses include: as a digestive aid; to prevent nausea due to motion sickness, morning sickness or chemotherapy; for cardiovascular disease, as ginger reduces cholesterol; and it may be useful in preventing cancer.
 
Chinese medicine
Ginger is a fixture in Chinese herbal medicine: the rhizomes are antiemetic, cardiotonic, carminative, rubifacient and stimulate secretion, and it is used to treat abdominal pain, burns, colds, hangovers, hypercholesterolaemia, motion sickness, pancreatitis, Raynaud phenomenon, nausea, seafood intoxication and vomiting.

Herbal medicine
Ginger has been used in Western herbal medicine for arthritic pain, earache, gout, headache, kidney conditions, menstrual cramping, motion sickness, sinusitis and vertigo.

gin·ger

(jin'jĕr)
The dried rhizome of Zingiber officinale, known in commerce as Jamaica ginger, African ginger, and Cochin ginger. The outer cortical layers are often either partially or completely removed; used as a carminative and flavoring agent.
[L. zingiber]
References in periodicals archive ?
The sword Tai'e which is mentioned here was made by Gan Jiang and Ou Ye, two of the great southern swordsmiths of antiquity.
(2.) For example, Lu Xun [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1881-1936) redeveloped the story of Gan Jiang, Mo Ye, and their son Chi Bi [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]; see his Gushi xinbian [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (Shanghai: Wenhua shenghuo chubanshe, 1925), 93-122.
In his translation of the Zhanguo ce, Crump interpreted the term Gan as a reference to the famous sword Gan Jiang: "The sword of Wu-kan [i.e., Ganjiang of Wu] when used on flesh could cleave an ox or a horse asunder and against metal it could split bronze vessels.