Gamma ray

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Gamma ray

A high-energy photon, emitted by radioactive substances.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gamma-ray spectroscopy techniques are continuously progressing due to rapid advances in the development and fabrication of fast and higher light output scintillation materials [1-3].
Using data collected by the NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and other facilities, the space agency announced Thursday that "an international team of scientists has found the first gamma-ray binary in another galaxy and the most luminous one ever seen."
These exploding stars use all of their energy to emit one last strong beam of highly energetic radiation - known as a gamma-ray burst - before they die.
Gamma-ray astronomy got a big boost in 1991 with the launch of the NASA's now-defunct Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO).
Washington, February 15 ( ANI ): Analysis of data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided the first clear-cut evidence the expanding debris of exploded stars produces some of the fastest-moving matter in the universe.
Or that the telescope had for the first time captured the visible glow of a gamma-ray burst while it was still spewing high-energy radiation.
Washington, January 8 ( ANI ): Using a combination of data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), astronomers have zeroed in on the source of the months-long blast of energy launched by an enormous black hole almost 11 billion years ago swept past Earth in 2011.
SGR 1900+14 and SGR 0526-66 belong to a class of stars known as soft gamma-ray repeaters because they sporadically emit low-energy gamma rays.
For a fleeting moment, gamma-ray bursts radiate more energy than any quasar, then they vanish without a trace.
Washington, November 27 (ANI): NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has made the first unambiguous detection of high-energy gamma-rays from an enigmatic microquasar.