Gamma ray

(redirected from Gamma-ray)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Gamma-ray: gamma emission

Gamma ray

A high-energy photon, emitted by radioactive substances.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gamma-ray bursts are mammoth explosions featuring jets of high-speed particles that spawn gamma rays.
Gamma-ray bursts can be seen over extremely long distances-billions of light-years.
Topics of the 22 invited talks include high-energy neutrino astronomy, the origin of galactic cosmic rays, the highest-energy cosmic rays, cosmic rays and gamma radiation from clusters of galaxies, gamma-ray blazars, non-thermal x-ray emission from supernova remnants, gamma-ray line astronomy, and neutrino telescopes.
Additional contributions to the width, that are not currently accounted for, include fluctuations in the amount of energy a gamma-ray actually deposits in the detector (currently, it is assumed that each photon deposits its full energy) and background due to neutrons that are scattered off the target and subsequently capture in other surrounding materials.
Since then, in 2700 hours of observation time, the HESS array has continuously explored the Galaxy and discovered many other sources and types of source of gamma rays, extending ever further the field of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy.
If this is true, this should lead to a gamma-ray excess - one that can't be explained as originating from any known phenomenon.
Kevork Abazajian, Nicolas Canac, Shunsaku Horiuchi and Manoj Kaplinghat analyzed data from NASA's space-borne Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and found that only a narrow range of dark matter models can produce an excess of gamma rays coming from the Milky Way.
The new study looks at what happens to gamma-ray photons in the extreme environment near the accretion disk, not on the longer blazar-to-Earth voyage.
Three times since April 2008, he and his collaborators witnessed the same pattern: "Just one day after the gamma-ray flare--boom!
Using data collected by the NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and other facilities, the space agency announced Thursday that "an international team of scientists has found the first gamma-ray binary in another galaxy and the most luminous one ever seen."
On June 14, the pulse of high-energy light produced by this event finally arrived at Earth, setting off detectors aboard NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and other satellites.

Full browser ?