gamete

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gamete

 [gam´ēt]
1. one of two haploid reproductive cells, male (spermatozoon) and female (oocyte), whose union is necessary in sexual reproduction to initiate the development of a new individual.
2. the malarial parasite in its sexual form in a mosquito's stomach, either male (microgamete) or female (macrogamete); the latter is fertilized by the former to develop into an ookinete. adj., adj gamet´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

gam·ete

(gam'ēt),
1. One of two haploid cells that can undergo karyogamy.
2. Any germ cell, whether oocyte or sperm.
[G. gametēs, husband; gametē, wife]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gamete

(găm′ēt′, gə-mēt′)
n.
A reproductive cell having the haploid number of chromosomes, especially a mature sperm or egg capable of fusing with a gamete of the opposite sex to produce a zygote.

ga·met′ic (-mĕt′ĭk) adj.
ga·met′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

gamete

Genetics A mature ♀ or ♂ reproductive cell–sperm or ovum/egg with a haploid set of chromosomes–23 for humans. See Chromosome, Haploid, Macrogamete, Microgamete, Nullisomic gamete.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gam·ete

(gam'ēt)
1. One of two haploid cells undergoing karyogamy.
2. Any germ cell, whether oocyte or sperm.
[G. gametēs, husband; gametē, wife]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

gamete

A cell, such as a sperm or ovum, possessing half the normal number of chromosomes (haploid) and capable of fusing with another gamete in the process of fertilization, so that the full (diploid) number of chromosomes is made up. From the Greek gamos , marriage.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

gamete

or

germ cell

a specialized HAPLOID cell that fuses with a gamete from the opposite sex (or mating type) to form a diploid ZYGOTE. In simple organisms, the process is called isogamy (see ISOGAMETE), and OOGAMY in more complex organisms. In animals where oogamy occurs male gametes are called sperm, the female gametes eggs. The situation in higher plants is more complicated, but essentially the male gamete is the generative nucleus found in the POLLEN GRAIN while the female gamete is the egg cell found within the EMBRYO SAC.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Gamete

An egg (ovum) from the female or a mature sperm from the male.
Mentioned in: Infertility Therapies
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Once my skin-cell gametes are combined to produce embryos, their whole genomes will be sequenced to see exactly what combination of genetic traits they carry.
The applicant argued that the legislative provisions only require that a sperm donor must be living at the stage when gametes are withdrawn.
Caption: Figure 3: Possible chromosomal patterns of gametes that can be generated in meiosis I
Artificial gametes: a systematic review of biological progress towards clinical application.
During that journey, in ways still incompletely understood, the gametes gain the capacity to form a new being.
"Gamete recognition was first compared to a lock and key mechanism more than one hundred years ago.
[4] I show that the regulations are premised on the notion that all gamete donation and all artificial fertilisation should involve a healthcare practitioner--in particular, a specialist in reproductive medicine.
"Discovering that lifestyle and environmental factors, such as a person's nutritional state, can shape the information in our gametes and thereby modify the eating behaviour of the next generation is, to my mind, an important find," he adds.
gametes contain the parental (sporophytic) chromosome number rather than
Incompatibility between gametes occurs both within and among species of broadcast-spawning invertebrates and is often mediated by variation in gamete recognition proteins (Palumbi and Metz, 1991; Palumbi, 1994).
Consider the following: a surrogacy agreement has been confirmed by the High Court in terms of which the gametes of a certain HIVpositive commissioning father must be used.