Galenism

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Galenism

(gā′lə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The medical system based on the theories or practices of Galen.

Ga′len·ist adj. & n.

Galenism

Medical theory and practices as taught by the Greek physician Claudius Galen ca. 130–200. Galen brought some science into medicine but was mistaken in many of his ideas. His influence was so great that for 15 centuries it was considered heretical to question his dicta. Many important advances, such as the concept of the circulation of the blood and the appreciation of the dangers of blood-letting, were thereby delayed.
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Chief among them was Henry Stubbe, a staunch Galenist and member of the College of Physicians, who, in the late 1660s and early 1670s wrote a series of attacks on the Royal Society, particularly against the claims of Joseph Glanvill and Thomas Spratt that the new science would prove useful and progressive to England and to humanity at large.
As English Galenists modified and domesticated Galenic theory, new emphases emerged, the most significant among these being an exaggerated mistrust, not found to anything like the same degree in Galen himself, of the harmful properties of fruits and vegetables, as well as a distinctly different theory of beef's effects upon the human body.
Thus, he had an orthodox academic Galenist dislike of alchemists and Paracelsians, evident in his insistence that Arnald of Villanova was not "a miserable and vagabond chemist" but "the most learned physician of his time.
66) Therefore, Laurence Brockliss is not sufficiently nuanced in his statement that early seventeenth-century Galenists 'did talk of springs having an occult, "divine" quality': (67) the presence of occult qualities in the waters may not entail spiritual but merely unknown inherent properties and causes.
14) Also included are devout Galenists, such as the learned member of the Royal College of Physicians, Edward Jorden (d.
Part 3 also enlarges the range of physiological texts and criticism cited: Trevor's recognition that English Galenists such as the oft-cited Wright and Timothy Bright were themselves engaged in a contentious rhetorical debate is particularly useful, and a good balance to readings in which they serve as seemingly neutral "ground.
58) Broeckx, who has a voluminous publication history focused around the history of Belgian medicine, framed his interpretation of Van Helmont's unfortunate encounters with the academic establishment of the time as vengeful and petty attacks waged by traditional Galenists against a heroic but doomed reformer of medicine.
LaFew's exchange with Parolles has been taken in part as a reference to the Paracelsian attack on the more academic Galenists, whose herbal treatments are clearly not in line with Helena's more chemically-specific method of curing the king (Stensgaard 173-83).
XII, 2, 473); Dondi's invoking Hippocrates' or Galen's authority is simply that, an invocation (V, 2, 173; XII, 2, 454, 456; ICM, IV, 966); and Petrarch claims he can not react to Galen, but to a contemporary crowd of loquacious Galenists, a typical "Humanist" strategy of segregating dysfunctional modern readings (ICM, I, 830; V, 3, 173).
Since then, growing appreciation of the complexity of early modern debates about understanding nature, involving Galenists, Paracelsians, mechanical philosophers, and others, has revised our narrative of the Scientific Revolution and established alchemy's crucial role in early modern science.
While ecclesiastical authors saw themselves as authoritative, writers within other discourses paid them scant attention, even when their arguments were clearly known and understood, as with the Galenists and Andre the Chaplain.