Galenism


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Galenism

(gā′lə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The medical system based on the theories or practices of Galen.

Ga′len·ist adj. & n.

Galenism

Medical theory and practices as taught by the Greek physician Claudius Galen ca. 130–200. Galen brought some science into medicine but was mistaken in many of his ideas. His influence was so great that for 15 centuries it was considered heretical to question his dicta. Many important advances, such as the concept of the circulation of the blood and the appreciation of the dangers of blood-letting, were thereby delayed.
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I sincerely hope that this great book can fill the huge gap left by the oblivion of the transmission of one of the major trends of Late Ancient thought, Galenism, to Medieval thinkers.
(19) On the one hand, it might be argued, as Laurence Brockliss has done with regard to France, that in Scotland the professional appropriation of mineral waters 'played a definite role in the dethronement of Galenism as the establishment medical orthodoxy'.
(13) On the chemical revolution and the Paracelsian rejection of Galenism, see Debus and Pagel.
However, the controversy aroused by the new knowledge introduced by him, produced enemies since they stood against the galenism, which was accepted and practiced in the scientific circle of the time.
Culpeper's Ghost, Cole wrote that Culpeper had mellowed somewhat toward Galenism during his final illness.
In an essay on the introduction of Galenism into Tudor England, Vivian Nutton emphasizes the close relationship of medical learning to the other natural sciences and its distance from English natural philosophy.
Developments in medicine during the Renaissance played a fundamental part in the process of extinction of Galenism. Because they either occurred marginally in Portugal, or did not take place at all, Galen continued to dominate medicine.
Temkin, Galenism. Rise and decline of a medical philosophy (Ithaca and London, Cornell University Press, 1973), pp.
More complex than mere syncretization, the authors in this volume argue, transformations within the Irish medical world over the course of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries reflect the intersection of indigenous medical culture with a truly international intellectual culture in the wake of the scientific revolution and the collapse of Galenism.
Though it is now close to a commonplace that Galenism understood the individual in the Latinate meaning of that term--as undivided, in this case, from environment--I want to focus particularly on the means of monitoring and regulating that ail-inclusive system, namely on dietetic medicine, and particularly on the manipulation of the six non-naturals that helped to maintain a homeostatic balance both within the individual and between the individual and the environment of which he or she was a part.
In direct challenge to the humoral therapeutics of Galenism, Paracelsus and his followers introduced new, often toxic, chemicals into medical use.