galenic


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ga·len·ic

(gā-len'ik),
Relating to Galen or to his theories.

galenic

(gă-lĕn′ĭk)
Pert. to Galen or his teachings.
References in periodicals archive ?
Epistemological impossibility and chaos characterized Burton's attempt to collect data and classify symptoms about melancholy within Galenic medical categories and methodology.
In the Galenic one-sex model, a person can only be identified as a man or a "less-perfect" man.
Awareness of this Galenic model helps to contextualize the Puritan fear of hard-heartedness: As a religious condition, hard-heartedness was most damaging, indicating a hardening of the soul, shutting off not merely affection but the means of true spiritual understanding.
Perhaps the most emblematic example is seen in the Valencian medical doctor, Juan de Cabriada, who, in 1687, encouraged his countrymen to acknowledge that there was "another New World" that went beyond Galenic medicine.
I already knew the basic tale of the young anatomical upstart from Brussels who was thrown out of the University of Paris for daring to say that the ancient Galenic anatomy texts were inaccurate.
By the sixteenth century all-body symptoms relating to the Galenic faculties of natural, vital, and animal functions were cited more frequently than were signs linked to humoral disorders.
We first developed and tested several preparations including complete resin of frankincense in our pharmacy over years using various galenic basis material.
Although aromatherapy has evolved into a distinct art, the inhalation of plant oils or volatile oil rich galenic extracts is an undervalued aspect of modern phytotherapy.
Phlebotomy had been a normative practice of Galenic medicine since the earliest centuries of the Common Era.
The first chapter, subtitled "Mouths, Breath, and Throats in Early Modern Italy," uses the Aristotelian and Galenic views of the human body prevalent in the late Renaissance to present a thought-provoking reading of Monteverdi's soprano duet "O come sei gentile" (seventh book, 1619).
Jinner's medicines are based on classical pharmacology, thus demonstrating that women's medicine of the period was not necessarily a distinct praxis from the Galenic and Hippocratic therapeutics of male university-trained physicians.