Gaia hypothesis


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Gaia hypothesis

(gī′ə)
n.
1. A hypothesis stating that Earth's biota constitute a single interconnected system that affects or determines the physical and chemical conditions within the biosphere, including such conditions as global temperatures, the composition of the atmosphere, and the salinity of seawater.
2. Any of various related hypotheses stating that this system is self-regulating, as through feedback loops, or that it constitutes a living organism, in either case acting to maintain stable conditions that are optimal for the continuation of life.
Gaia is the theoretical opposite of Darwinism; it postulates that living organisms control and modify the relative compositions of the sea, air, and environment
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Underlying many of the issues Pak examines in this study is the influence of the Gaia hypothesis. Though, as Pak notes, the Gaia hypothesis did not begin to shape terraforming sf until the 1970s, the idea that humans are a part of an interdependent, living system pervades nearly all of the terraforming narrative tradition.
Russians did not anticipate all aspects of the Gaia hypothesis, but they were in a good position to embrace it and further develop it.
led Lovelock to hypothesize the Gaia hypothesis that the Earth behaves
The Gaia hypothesis - first articulated by James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis in the 1970s - holds that Earth's physical and biological processes are inextricably connected to form a self-regulating, essentially sentient, system.
The Gaia hypothesis -- first articulated by James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis in the 1970s -- holds that Earth's physical and biological processes are inextricably connected to form a self-regulating, essentially sentient, system.
Again, the Gaia hypothesis comes to mind, offsetting in a big way the popular notion of competition and survival of the fittest as nature's prime way.
James Lovelock is well known for his Gaia hypothesis, a revolutionary theory that the earth is a self-regulating super organism.
Contraceptive pill - developed by Herchel Smith, a researcher at the University of Manchester, in 1961 5= Cancer and cell division - in 1987, Paul Nurse and Tim Hunt, scientists for Cancer Research UK, became the first to identify the key genes that govern and regulate cell cycle and division 5= CDs, DVDs and the internet - these have all been made possible through a technology called strained quantum-well lasers, which was first proposed by Alf Adams at the University of Surrey 5= The Gaia hypothesis - James Lovelock's development of a revolutionary way of thinking about the Earth with the idea that it is a self-regulating living organism 8.
The film's representation of Eywa is strongly reminiscent of the Gaia Hypothesis, that is, of a living, self-regulating earth; as a Gaia figure, Eywa is very unlike traditional depictions of a separate, transcendent monotheistic (and characteristically male) deity who exists above and beyond nature.
Along the way, this history of the WEC touches on appropriate technology, geodesic domes, "access to tools," the Gaia hypothesis, Jerry Brown, the birth of personal computing, and the foundations of environmental consumerism at Ben & Jerry's, Patagonia, and Apple Computer.
Examples of subjects tackled by the volumes include alien abductions, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, chaos theory, drugs and direct-to-consumer advertising, the Gaia hypothesis, genetically modified organisms, green building design, information technology, intellectual property, medical marijuana, parapsychology, quarks, reproductive technology, research ethics, the scientific method, urban warfare, virtual reality, waste management, and wind energy.
The Gaia hypothesis is a scientific theory, developed by Lynn Margulis and James Lovelock, that claims the Earth acts as a living being in which all systems work together to regulate the climate.