Gaia hypothesis

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Related to Gaia Theory: deep ecology

Gaia hypothesis

(gī′ə)
n.
1. A hypothesis stating that Earth's biota constitute a single interconnected system that affects or determines the physical and chemical conditions within the biosphere, including such conditions as global temperatures, the composition of the atmosphere, and the salinity of seawater.
2. Any of various related hypotheses stating that this system is self-regulating, as through feedback loops, or that it constitutes a living organism, in either case acting to maintain stable conditions that are optimal for the continuation of life.
Gaia is the theoretical opposite of Darwinism; it postulates that living organisms control and modify the relative compositions of the sea, air, and environment
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James Lovelock's Gaia Theory fitted well with Teddy's ideas on the emergent properties of systems and as Jim lived near Camelford, where we were at the time publishing The Ecologist, we decided to hold a symposium on the implications of the Gaia Theory for ecology and the environment.
ALTHOUGH SIMILAR BELIEFS HAVE BEEN HELD by indigenous cultures around the globe, James Lovelock's Gaia Theory is the first Western scientific model to see the planet and the biosphere as one integrated self-regulating organism.
The book is organized around five succinct chapters summarizing in turn the Gaia theory, process theology, "new cosmology," ecofeminism, and liberation theology.
Gaia Theory offers a model for how the planet behaves and helps us identify Earth's "vital signs.
Visits from big scientific names of today are also in the pipeline and include James Lovelock, author of the Gaia theory of an "oragnic" Earth, and astronomer Sir Fred Hoyle.
Scharper sees -- for those who wish to read deeper -- antecedents to the Gaia theory in the work of G.
Finally, geophysiology, including Gaia theory, has reworked the biosphere into the most ancient and powerful of all living forms -- something so much greater than the human that it can evoke a religious response.
The Gaia Theory is still controversial, but I think the system's approach and perspective on life IS an important one.
But, as a chart for humanity, biocentrism, the Gaia theory, and the rejection of speciesism take us a step or two beyond the flat-worlders.
The Gaia theory -- which suggests that the earth is a single, self-regulating organism -- was first demonstrated using a crude computer model called Daisyworld created by scientist James Lovelock.
Snyder has continued to expound related ideas and has been a strong proponent of the Gaia theory, advanced by James Lovelock, which argues for the truly organic and selfregulating wholeness of the biosphere.