NPSR1

(redirected from GPRA)
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NPSR1

A gene on chromosome 7p14.3 that encodes a member of the G protein-coupled receptor 1 family which is expressed in respiratory cilia and in bronchial smooth muscle cells in asthmatics; NPSR1 may be active in signalling pathways in an autocrine or paracrine fashion.

Molecular pathology
NPSR1 mutations may play a pathogenetic role in asthma and other IgE-mediated diseases.
References in periodicals archive ?
The court had nullified the Comelec-Smartmatic's extended warranty contract on Tuesday because of violations of the GPRA, which lays down strict direct contracting provisions that the poll body had failed to satisfy.
GPRA requires agencies to produce strategic plans, annual performance plans, and annual performance reports.
Nonetheless, GPRA has surpassed expectations and defied its critics.
Experts are excited about GPRA because the protein it makes belongs to a class of molecules that have proved useful in drug design.
GPRA represents a fundamental effort to shift to results-oriented management and to move away from the traditional evaluative focus on budgetary inputs.
While each of the previous federal initiatives have been regarded as falling short of achieving their intended goals, as part of its analysis of GPRA implementation, the General Accounting Office (GAO) has stated that it is important to recognize that each of the initiatives have provided a significant contribution to the reform movement.
Adopting the underlying premise of the GPRA, the PM/HDP was motivated to determine requirements for the IMAS program based more on effectiveness than on efficiency.
This article will emphasize the major weakness of GPRA. It is a prime example of the difficulty of dealing with federal management as a government-wide strategy and a set of generic activities and requirements.
Chief, Special Projects Office and GPRA Pilot Project Manager
While GPRA has antecedents in previous federal governmental reform efforts, it contains several unusual attributes that reflect a widespread concern about accountability and effectiveness.
During the past few months, the Washington press (which is rarely interested in management issues) has focused unusual attention to the implementation of GPRA, reporting various pronouncements from the General Accounting Office (GAO), the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and the Republican leadership in Congress about the relative success or failure of federal agencies to comply with its initial requirements related to strategic planning.
When Congress passed the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) in 1993, few people outside the Beltway paid much attention.