UTS2R

(redirected from GPR14)

UTS2R

A gene on chromosome 17q25.3 that encodes a high-affinity G-coupled protein receptor for urotensin-2 and urotensin-2B, which produce potent but variable vasoconstriction in some vascular beds, and vasodilation in others; they are implicated in osmoregulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chambers et al., "Human urotensin-II is a potent vasoconstrictor and agonist for the orphan receptor GPR14," Nature, vol.
It is the agonist for the orphan receptor GPR14 presently known as UII receptor (UT).
Membranes were subsequently incubated with primary rabbit polyclonal anti-GPCR GPR14 antibodies (1: 1000; ab156003, Abcam) and anti-[beta]-actin antibodies (1:500 TA-09, Zhongshan Gold Bridge Biotechnology Co., Ltd., Beijing, China) overnight at 4[degrees]C, followed by incubation with horseradish peroxidase- (HRP-) conjugated anti-rabbit antibodies (1: 500, Zhongshan Gold Bridge Biotechnology Co., Ltd., Beijing, China).
Urotensin II receptor (UT) is a Gq protein coupled receptor originally identified as the orphan GPR14 receptor by Ames et al.
The mitogenic effect of U-II is mediated by its receptor GPR14 (G-protein coupled receptor 14) and hence it can be inhibited by GPR14 antagonist [16].
Effects of urantide on the gene and protein expression of U-II and GPR14 in vascular smooth muscle cells
The human UT-II (hU-II) is a cyclic undecapeptide, HGlu-Thr-Pro-Asp-c[Cys-Phe-Trp-Lys-Tyr-Cys]-Val-OH, recognized as the natural ligand of an orphan G-protein coupled receptor, first named as a rat receptor with high affinity for U-II, GPR14 [10-12].
Imai et al., "Co-expression of urotensin II and its receptor (GPR14) in human cardiovascular and renal tissues," Journal of Hypertension, vol.
Binding with high affinity to a G-coupled protein receptor (GPR14, urotensin II receptor) (3), UII is a potent vasoconstrictor of isolated vessels; exogenous UII administration to primates causes circulatory collapse via intense coronary artery vasoconstriction (3).
Increased expression of urotensin II and its cognate receptor GPR14 in atherosclerotic lesions of the human aorta.
The company identifies the new protein receptor (GPR14) as part of a drive to understand the biological function of a family of human substances known as G-protein-coupled receptors, a large class of proteins that lie on the surface of various cells and receive messages from hormones.
In the course of its research SmithKline attempted to identify the human hormone that interacts with GPR14. The researchers eventually found a match: urotensin-II, a hormone that was discovered 30 years ago.