GPR1

GPR1

A gene on chromosome 1p36.1-p35 that encodes an orphan G-coupled protein receptor, which may modulate various brain activities, such as behavioural responses to stress, amyloid-beta peptid generation in neurons and neurite outgrowth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chemerin elicits potent constrictor actions via chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1), not G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (GPR1), in human and rat vasculature.
Zeilinger, "The seven-transmembrane receptor Gpr1 governs processes relevant for the antagonistic interaction of Trichoderma atroviride with its host," Microbiology, vol.
Chemerin, CMKLR1, and GPR1 are localized specifically on Leydig cells and poorly on germ cells [16].
Chemerin binds to three receptors including CMKLR1 (also known as ChemR23), chemokine receptor-like 2 (CCRL2), and G protein-coupled receptor 1 (GPR1); and the chemerin-CMKLR1 axis plays multiple roles in the control of inflammation, metabolism, and carcinogenesis in different organs and systems [19].
It is known that chemerin is a ligand of three receptors: chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMLKR1), G-protein coupled receptor 1 (GPR1) and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-like 2 (CCRL2).
GPR1 is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), originally found in human [3], which was identified by in vitro experiment as receptor for chemerin [4, 5].
[6] While most HIV-1 variants use CCR5 and CXCR4 as the main co-receptor in vivo, up to 12 other chemokine co-receptors (including CCR2b, CXCR6 and GPR1) for HIV infection have been identified in vitro.
Accordingly, partial inactivation of PKA catalytic subunits, cAMP synthesis, or regulatory proteins of the pathway (e.g., Cdc35/Cyr1, Cdc25, Gpr1, and Gpa2 in yeast) are frequently used as calorie restriction mimetics and mitigate aging and/or age-related diseases in mice [9, 81, 82], Drosophila [83], and yeast ([4, 84], Figure 1(b)).
The epithelial surface expresses all the receptors necessary for HIV infection including CD4, CCR5, CXCR4 [64, 65], and various other G protein-coupled coreceptors (GPCRs) known to mediate entry of HIV into cells (including CCR2b, CXCR6, and GPR1) [63, 66], indicating a vast area of the female genital tract that can potentially be infected.
Our goal was to further determine the effect of the GPR1 pathway on mating and to determine any reciprocal effect.
(2000) postulate that "[their] findings suggest that an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, GPR1, is a coreceptor expressed in [renal] mesangial cells ...
Chemerin exerts its physiological functions through the binding of three G protein-coupled receptors: the chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1), G protein-coupled receptor 1 (GPR1), and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-like 2 (CCRL2) [195, 199].