genetically modified food

(redirected from GMO food)
Any food genetically modified to resist or tolerate pesiticides, insects, or viruses, or to decrease spoilage, produce antibodies, decrease fatty acid synthesis, or increase production of certain amino acids
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ge·net·i·cal·ly mod·i·fied food

(jĕ-net'ik-ă-lē mod'i-fīd fūd)
Scientifically altered foodstuffs intended to limit exposure of the plants or animals to disease or spoilage. Concerns about safety and efficacy have been raised worldwide.
Synonym(s): frankenfood.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

genetically modified food

Any crop or agricultural product altered by biological engineering for drought resistance, increased growth, resistance to pests or pesticides, prolonged shelf-life, altered textures or flavors, or other economically or commercially desirable characteristics. Promoters of genetically modified foods point to their improved yields (which may have a beneficial impact on agricultural profits or world hunger). Opponents of genetic modification have raised concerns about its effects on ecosystems, human food allergies, and religious dietary laws.
Synonym: bioengineered food
See also: food
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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There are only two industrialized nations that do not require GMO food labeling -- the U.S.
At negotiations earlier this year on a biodiversity protocol covering trade in GMO food products, the United States led a bloc that called labeling requirements too restrictive.
In March, CFS and 50 other scientific, consumer and green groups filed a legal petition to FDA requesting mandatory labels for GMO foods. CFS says the proposed plan means FDA will not be doing any testing on GMO food, but instead relying solely on industry data.
A group of farm state governors worried that opposition to GMO food could hurt farmers and biotech companies announced plans to use their clout to promote the industry.
Amount of agricultural land utilized for producing GMO food such as GMO soybean has surged over the past few years, with majority of producers being situated in the U.S., Canada, India, Brazil and Argentina.
The DOM political party, which opposes the introduction of GMO food, says a broad debate needs to be launched in which all the parties concerned would take part.
GMO food has been an important issue recently, with as many as 39 percent of American consumers looking for food and beverages with a GMO-free label, a figure that rises to 47 percent among those age 35-44 and 57 percent of those age 25-34, according to Mintel's May 2016 "Free-From Food Trends" report.
We are almost the only country in the world that allows GMO food to be sold, for one.