privacy

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pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
The legislative history of the GLBA tends to support the first, more restrictive interpretation of the grandfather clause.
The FTC may already have the power to regulate mobile payments through use of the GLBA. (216) The FTC Act gives the FTC broad discretion to regulate mobile payment companies that are engaging in deceptive or unfair behavior.
(97) See McTaggart & Freese, supra note 9, at 495 (observing that banks will now be in contact with mobile carriers and mobile application developers, to whom the GLBA does not yet expressly apply).
At the heart of the GLBA was a partial repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act.
Since the GLBA, not only may banks affiliate with securities firms
However, a few very large institutions used GLBA to develop holding companies, most notably Citigroup and Travelers, and JP Morgan and Chase.
* [H.sub.8i]: significance of the effects of GLBA (1999) on insurer volatility.
As discussed above, "financial institutions" covered by GLBA, "covered entities" governed by HIPAA, and websites directed at children that fall under COPPA are all required to maintain and enforce a privacy policy.
The regulators hope that delaying the mandatory compliance date will help institutions incorporate, if they so wish, the affiliate marketing notice into their GLBA privacy notice.
The bill's requirements for what constitutes a security policy are similar to those in GLBA.
laws--the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA), and the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Act of 2002--affect virtually every aspect of an organization's information-sharing practices.
Today's US regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley, HIPAA, PCI and GLBA are designed to reduce fraud and to implement better security systems for the protection of financial information and personal data.