gastrointestinal bleeding

(redirected from GI bleed)

gastrointestinal bleeding

any bleeding from the GI tract. The most common underlying conditions are peptic ulcer, Mallory-Weiss syndrome, esophageal varices, diverticulosis, ulcerative colitis, and carcinoma of the stomach and colon. Vomiting of bright red blood or passage of coffee ground vomitus indicates upper GI bleeding, usually from the esophagus, stomach, or upper duodenum. Aspiration of the gastric contents, lavage, and endoscopy are performed to determine the site and rate of bleeding. Tarry black stools indicate a bleeding source in the upper GI tract; bright red blood from the rectum usually indicates bleeding in the distal colon. GI bleeding is treated as a potential emergency. Patients may require transfusions, fluid replacement, endoscopic treatment, or gastric lavage and are watched carefully so as to prevent shock and hypovolemia. In all patients blood loss is evaluated and ability to coagulate is tested. See also coffee-ground vomitus, hematochezia, melena.

gastrointestinal bleeding

Any hemorrhage into the GI tract lumen, from esophagus–eg, from ruptured esophageal varices, to anus–eg from hemorrhoids

gastrointestinal bleeding

Bleeding from anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract.
Synonym: gastrointestinal hemorrhage
See also: bleeding
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with risk factors for an upper GI bleed (such as abdominal pain, peptic ulcer disease, anemia, etc.
Signs that may red-flag a GI bleed include vomiting blood, and tarry or bloody bowel movements.
Chan pointed out, continuous aspirin use has been associated with a threefold risk of a lower GI bleed.
Analysis of data from 73,863 women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study II in 1989 showed that current users of menopausal hormone therapy had a 46% increase in the risk of a major gastrointestinal bleed and a more than twofold increase in the risk of a lower GI bleed or ischemic colitis, compared with never users, said Dr.
They calculated that, as a result, 770 patients would need to be treated with acid-suppressants to prevent one nosocomial GI bleed and that 834 patients would need to be treated to prevent one clinically significant GI bleed (Herzog et al.
Others included GI bleed or liver problems, leukemias, lymphomas, and other cancers.
Research suggests the risk of death increases by a staggering 41% for patients who suffer an upper GI bleed and are taken to hospital on a public holiday.
M's case, a pharmacodynamic drug-drug interaction among citalopram, aspirin, and clopidogrel caused a GI bleed.
Your risk of GI bleeding is higher if you have a history of ulcers or a previous GI bleed and/or you are taking an anticoagulant medication such as warfarin (Coumadin) or heparin.
We used the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research's (AHRQ's) Quality Indicator report to identify six conditions for which mortality was considered an important indicator of quality: AMI, hip fracture, stroke, CHF, GI bleed, and pneumonia (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality 2002).
The basis for the negligence involving a GI bleed allegation stemmed from a nurse's note, written nine days prior to the incident, that stated the man's "abdomen was firm, but no impaction.
Despite vigorous attempts to correct the patient's multiple medical problems, he developed a massive GI bleed and expired 5 days after admission.