G protein

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G protein

A cellular protein activated by the binding of an intercellular signal to its receptor on the cell membrane; the G-protein then activates the enzyme adenyl cyclase within the cell, triggering the formation of cyclic AMP and a stereotyped response.
See also: protein
References in periodicals archive ?
tuberculosis: Mycobacterium tuberculosis AMs: Alveolar macrophages RRTB: Resistance to Rifampicin Tuberculosis MDR-TB: Multidrug-resistant TB SDG: Sustainable Development Goals XDR-TB: Extremely drug-resistant TB GTPases: Guanosine triphosphatases G-proteins: GTP binding proteins PDB: Protein Data Bank NCBI: National Center for Biotechnology Information SAPS: SAP Application Performance Standard I-TASSER: Iterative Threading Assembly Refinement LOMETS: Local metathreading server RAMPAGE: Ramachandran Plot Analysis UniProt-GOA: Gene ontology annotation.
Bitter and sweet taste receptors, unlike ion-stimulated taste receptors for saltiness and sour sensation, are G-protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) [7, 8].
Finally, ethanol treatment had differential effects on various G-proteins in cells expressing only D2S or D2L, eliciting a marked increase in Gs expression and a decrease in Gi3 expression in D2S cells but a moderate increase in Gs and marked increase in Gi3 expression in D2L (Sengupta and Sarkar 2012).
Pharmacomechanical coupling: the role ofcalcium, G-proteins, kinases and phosphatases.
This facilitates interactions with intracellular heterotrimeric G-proteins and enables transmission of the signal.
Kobilka has been working on achieving an atomic-scale image of a G-protein bound to its GPCR.
The worker molecules that G-proteins target include ion channels, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or phospholipase C second messenger systems.
Direct activation of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) by substance P and compound 48/80.
Recent studies have indicated that organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) may disrupt metabolism by altering the expression or function of adenylyl cyclase (AC; the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of cAMP from ATP) or G-protein-coupled receptors and G-proteins involved in the AC signaling cascade.
Statins decrease the products of the mevalonate pathway, including geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, which is required for the activity of small G-proteins (3).
Good old G-proteins weren't the complete story, I realized, since some of these things could signal through various kinase pathways, and then there was all that craziness with beta-arrestins, and on and on.
According to Anastasios Lymperopoulos, Ph.D., the production of aldosterone was previously thought to be solely the result of the activation of G-proteins.