general intelligence factor

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general intelligence factor

Abbreviation: g
The hypothetical common feature identified by all intelligence (IQ) tests. The concept of general intelligence was developed by Charles Spearman, a British psychologist and statistician, who noticed that students who do well in one subject tend to do well in all school subjects and that students who do poorly in one field of study also lag behind in others. He proposed that the general ability to master academic material was due to superior general intelligence and that specific cognitive talents correlated with overall intellectual superiority. This concept, like many others in the field of psychometrics and intelligence testing, is controversial.
See also: factor
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers like Jensen (The g Factor: The Science of Mental Ability, 1998) and Herrnstein and Murray (The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class in American Life, 1994), have long argued that 'intelligence quotient' scores on supposedly 'g-loaded' tests reflect the innate cognitive abilities of individuals and groups.
Flynn demonstrates that the most g-loaded subtest on the WISC, that is the Raven's Similarities test has shown much change over time.
The fact that many of the subtests are only weakly correlated with each other, and that the best predictor of earnings is only weakly correlated with their "g-loaded" score, only heightens doubts that a single-ability model is a satisfactory description of human intelligence.