futile care


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A medical intervention that does not lead to improvement in the patient’s prognosis, comfort, well-being, or general state of health

futile care

In clinical practice, esp. in the care of patients at the end of life, any intervention that will not improve a patient's health, well-being, comfort, or prognosis.
See: advance directive; hospice
See also: care
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References in periodicals archive ?
The relationship between moral distress and perception of futile care in the critical care unit.
Theme 4: End-of-life issues: maintaining futile care or withdrawing treatment
The trouble is that even doctors who hate to administer futile care must find a way to address the wishes of patients and families.
This is particularly apparent in situations where futile care is suspected, or when institutional constraints impede the delivery of quality nursing care (Elpern et al., 2005; McClendon & Buckner, 2007; Mobley et al., 2007; Wilkinson, 1987).
Perceptions of "futile care" among caregivers in intensive care units.
The November issue of the High tower Lowdown, edited by Jim Hightower, reports that one state has a law called the Futile Care Law.
Critical care nurses describe futile care leading to experiences of moral distress associated with emotional exhaustion and burnout.
* Care in the last year of life accounts for more than one-quarter of Medicare spending, and half of patients die against their wishes in the hospital, receiving futile care at great cost.
Medical futility could pejoratively be misappropriated when it is referred to as the 'futile care concept'.
After her diagnosis, the hunger remained, but it was life and not truth that she was desperate for." With access to the most heroic and most expensive but likely futile care, Sontag went from research into therapies at Memorial Sloan-Kettering in New York City to an extremely chancy blood marrow transplant in Seattle--which failed.
One example of self-serving altruism is solving the problem of futile care. The following discussion draws on information and ideas in a presentation on futile care by Martin Smith, director of clinical ethics in the Department of Bioethics, Cleveland Clinic.