Fusobacterium

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Fusobacterium

 [fu″so-bak-tē´re-um]
a genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found as normal flora in the mouth and large bowel and often in necrotic tissue, probably as secondary invaders. Species include F. gonidiafor´mans and F. morti´ferum (occurring in respiratory, urogenital, and gastrointestinal infections); F. necro´phorum (occurring in disseminated infections involving necrotic lesions, abscesses, and bacteremia); and F. navifor´me, F. nuclea´tum, F. rus´sii, and F. va´rium (occurring in abscesses and other infections).

Fusobacterium

(fyū'zō-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm),
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming, nonmotile, obligately anaerobic rods that produce butyric acid as a major metabolic product. These organisms are found in cavities of humans and other animals; some species are pathogenic. The type species is Fusobacterium nucleatum.
[L. fusus, a spindle, + bacterium]

Fu·so·bac·te·ri·um

(fū'zō-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming, obligately anaerobic rods that produce butyric acid as a major metabolic product. These organisms are found in cavities of humans and other animals; some species are pathogenic.
[L. fusus, a spindle, + bacterium]

Fu·so·bac·te·ri·um

(fū'zō-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming, nonmotile, obligately anaerobic rods; found in oral cavities of humans and other animals; some species are pathogenic.
[L. fusus, a spindle, + bacterium]
References in periodicals archive ?
Those with the acute coronary syndrome had more Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and Actinobacteria, while Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria were more abundant in those with stable angina.
Vets all know that cat bites can transmit bacteria, such as Pasteurella, Fusobacteria and Streptococci, and that Cat Scratch fever, caused by Bartonella henselae, is debilitating at best, so bites and scratches are taken very seriously.
The 434 genus of bacteria, belong to 30 phylum, the more popular bacteria were Proteobacteria (33.54%), following by Firmicutes (18.58), Acidobacteria (12.82%), Actinobacteria (9.27%), Bacteridetes (5.44%), Crenarchaeota (4.58%), Fusobacteria (2.66%), Verrucomicrobia (2.29%), Gemmatimonadetes (2.18%) and Planctomycetes (1.39%), and they were more than 92.75%.
The dominant five phyla observed in stool samples have been Firmicutes , Bacteroidetes , Proteobacteria , Actinobacteria , and Fusobacteria , ranked in the order of abundance.
Researchers have discovered a different type, fusobacteria, in more advanced colon cancer.
Of the major reported phyla, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were the most abundant in acute infections, while Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria were the most abundant in chronic infections.
Phyla with a representation of 0.5% and higher (relative abundance) are presented in Figure 1: Firmicutes (40.7%), Bacteroidetes (34.7%), Proteobacteria (6.1%), Synergistetes (3.9%), Fusobacteria (3.5%), Actinobacteria (3.4%), Spirochetes (1.2%), and Cyanobacteria (0.5%).
Many types of bacteria may cause the liver abscesses but the most common are in the groups Fusobacteria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Truepelellar and Bacteroides.
The proportion of Euryarchaeota increased linearly, whereas the proportion of Fusobacteria decreased linearly with increasing levels of AFE (p = 0.04).
Fusobacteria also produce virulence factors including lipopolysaccharide, leukocidins, neutrophilcytotoxic factors, lipases, hemolysins, hemagglutinins, and beta-lactamase [12, 13].
Sequencing analysis showed that gut microbiota of the two groups were mainly classified into four phyla, including the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Fusobacteria (Figure 3).