complete blood count

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com·plete blood count (CBC),

a combination of the following determinations: red blood cell count, white blood cell count, erythrocyte indices, hematocrit, differential blood count, and sometimes platelet count.

complete blood count

n. Abbr. CBC
The determination of the quantity of each type of blood cell in a given sample of blood, often including the amount of hemoglobin, the hematocrit, and the proportions of various white cells.

complete blood count

See CBC.

com·plete blood count

(CBC) (kŏm-plēt' blŭd kownt)
A combination of the following determinations: red blood cell indices and count, white blood cell count, hematocrit, hemoglobin, platelets, and differential blood count.

Complete blood count (CBC)

A routine analysis performed on a sample of blood taken from the patient's vein with a needle and vacuum tube. The measurements taken in a CBC include a white blood cell count, a red blood cell count, the red cell distribution width, the hematocrit (ratio of the volume of the red blood cells to the blood volume), and the amount of hemoglobin (the blood protein that carries oxygen). CBCs are a routine blood test used for many medical reasons, not only for AIDS patients. They can help the doctor determine if a patient is in advanced stages of the disease.

com·plete blood count

(kŏm-plēt' blŭd kownt)
Laboratory-based combination of: red blood cell count, white blood cell count, erythrocyte indices, hematocrit, differential blood count, and often a platelet count.
References in periodicals archive ?
The full blood count and CD4 count are two frequently performed tests in HIV-endemic settings such as Gauteng province, South Africa.
Full blood count analyser technologies have developed rapidly over the last 20 years.
The aim of our study was to validate current NHLS reference ranges for the Gauteng region for full blood count and absolute CD4 lymphocyte counts in the face of technological advances and shifting population demographics.
The accuracy of the full blood count and CD4 values was subject to strict internal and external quality assurance procedures.
Of the 631 female participants, 41 females were removed from statistical analyses because their full blood count results were suggestive of anaemia (HGB <12 g/dl and MCV <80 fl); (15) this may have skewed the data.