fugue

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Related to Fugues: fugal, Fugue state, Tetu

fugue

 [fūg]
a pathological state of altered consciousness in which an individual may act and wander around as though conscious but his behavior is not directed by his complete normal personality and is not remembered after the fugue ends.
dissociative fugue (psychogenic fugue) a dissociative disorder characterized by an episode in which an individual forgets his past, assumes a partial or complete new identity, and travels away from home or work, in some cases taking up a new name, occupation, and lifestyle. During the fugue, patients are unaware that they have forgotten anything and seem to other people to be behaving normally; following recovery, they recall nothing that happened during the fugue. The disorder is usually related to emotional conflicts due to some traumatic, stressful, or overwhelming event, remits spontaneously, and rarely recurs.

fugue

(fyūg),
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one for a period of time, often in a different city; afterward, the person has amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills, and procedural memory, are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

(fyo͞og)
n.
Psychiatry A dissociative state, usually caused by trauma, marked by sudden travel or wandering away from home and an inability to remember one's past.

fu′gal (fyo͞o′gəl) adj.
fu′gal·ly adv.
fugue v.
fugu′ist (fyo͞o′gĭst) n.
Neurology A state in which the patient denies memory of activities for a period of hours to weeks; to external appearances, these activities were either completely normal or the patient disappeared and travelled extensively; most are functional; short fugues rarely occur in temporal lobe epilepsy
Psychiatry A state of personality dissociation characterised by amnesia and possibly physical flight from the customary environment or field of conflict

fugue

(fyūg)
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one, often in a different city; afterward, alleges amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

A rare psychological reaction to an intolerable situation in which the affected person wanders away from the old environment, apparently in a state of AMNESIA, and takes on a new identity, occupation and life. The loss of memory is selective and does not preclude use of the previous education. If there is recovery from the fugue, amnesia for the period of the fugue occurs.

Fugue

A dissociative experience during which a person travels away from home, has amnesia for their past, and may be confused about their identity but otherwise appear normal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since tactile memory, which takes time to cultivate, dictates the fluency in playing fugues, students must practice the fugue consistently each day to ensure progress toward fluency.
And the fugue transcriptions presented in this book--beautifully presented, thoroughly glossed and explained, and now (for the first time) readily available--are proof of that attraction.
Friel said: "We start off in the first episode and Marcella seems to be OK, but she has a fugue for the first time in months and it completely throws her as she thought she was over them.
Sources), and also to Siglind Bruhn's useful fugue charts to all 48 fugues, in her four-volume study, J.
Gass's technique of extension/expansion may be understood in compliance with musical structures, as is the case in one of his more overtly musicalized texts--"A Fugue" passage in The Tunnel, This excerpt may be considered a piece of evidence bringing out Gass's interest in formal musical transpositions in literature and as an interesting example of how such musicalization may be brought into being.
IN THE LINER NOTES to the 1993 recording of Lou Harrison's Fugue Percussion (1941), the composer relates how he and John Cage met in "a good pie shop" in San Francisco to work out the "is-tos and as-tos" of employing in rhythmic form the tonal relations found in a fugue.
It is now known that much of the autograph of The art of fugue dates from around 1742, roughly the time when Bach finished compiling The well-tempered clavier, book 2.
Composed in 1950-51 in under five months, the Preludes and Fugues initially encountered the hostile reception of a Soviet state under the influence of Zhdanovism, which accused Shostakovich and notable contemporaries such as Myaskovsky, Prokofiev, and Khachaturian of formalism and anti-Soviet tendencies.
Bach's well-tempered clavier; an exploration of the 48 preludes and fugues.
Contract award notice: maintenance of telephone systems, and anti-sick calls fugues in nursing homes.
Bespectacled and wearing tails, cummerbund and a harassed look he pounded his way through the first three-quarters of the 24 preludes and fugues like a man in a hurry to be somewhere else.