fugue

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Related to Fughetta: fugue, Double fugue

fugue

 [fūg]
a pathological state of altered consciousness in which an individual may act and wander around as though conscious but his behavior is not directed by his complete normal personality and is not remembered after the fugue ends.
dissociative fugue (psychogenic fugue) a dissociative disorder characterized by an episode in which an individual forgets his past, assumes a partial or complete new identity, and travels away from home or work, in some cases taking up a new name, occupation, and lifestyle. During the fugue, patients are unaware that they have forgotten anything and seem to other people to be behaving normally; following recovery, they recall nothing that happened during the fugue. The disorder is usually related to emotional conflicts due to some traumatic, stressful, or overwhelming event, remits spontaneously, and rarely recurs.

fugue

(fyūg),
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one for a period of time, often in a different city; afterward, the person has amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills, and procedural memory, are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

(fyo͞og)
n.
Psychiatry A dissociative state, usually caused by trauma, marked by sudden travel or wandering away from home and an inability to remember one's past.

fu′gal (fyo͞o′gəl) adj.
fu′gal·ly adv.
fugue v.
fugu′ist (fyo͞o′gĭst) n.
Neurology A state in which the patient denies memory of activities for a period of hours to weeks; to external appearances, these activities were either completely normal or the patient disappeared and travelled extensively; most are functional; short fugues rarely occur in temporal lobe epilepsy
Psychiatry A state of personality dissociation characterised by amnesia and possibly physical flight from the customary environment or field of conflict

fugue

(fyūg)
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one, often in a different city; afterward, alleges amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

A rare psychological reaction to an intolerable situation in which the affected person wanders away from the old environment, apparently in a state of AMNESIA, and takes on a new identity, occupation and life. The loss of memory is selective and does not preclude use of the previous education. If there is recovery from the fugue, amnesia for the period of the fugue occurs.

Fugue

A dissociative experience during which a person travels away from home, has amnesia for their past, and may be confused about their identity but otherwise appear normal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Playfully titled Chorus Angelorum, Piccolassima Fughetta, Molto Tonale, Sopra un Tema, Torentoni Niventis Wilderi, it is--as the title suggests--a fugal motet written for three voices without accompaniment, taking as its text the words "Merry Christmas" and "Happy New Year" in several translations.
For students who might not yet be quite ready to graduate to playing an actual Prelude and Fugue from The Well-Tempered Clavier, the Prelude and Fughetta in G Major, BWV 902, is a worthwhile alternative; indeed the Fughetta was later extended and reworked by Bach into the 15th Fugue of Book Two of The Well-Tempered Clavier.
Zachau employs only the first melodic phrase of the chorale as the subject for a chorale fughetta. In a three-part texture, Klotz states the cantus firmus in the tenor in longer notes over a pedal ostinato, with an obbligato upper part incorporating mildly dissonant chromatic inflections.
At Levels 9 and 10, the student may continue with the more difficult of the Bach Short Preludes such as the Prelude in D Major, BWV 936 (a delightful trio sonata), the Prelude in D Major, BWV 925 (a fughetta), and the Prelude in F Major, BWV 928 (displaying hints of a concerto grosso composed for keyboard).