fugue

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Related to Fuge: Foge, Fugue state

fugue

 [fūg]
a pathological state of altered consciousness in which an individual may act and wander around as though conscious but his behavior is not directed by his complete normal personality and is not remembered after the fugue ends.
dissociative fugue (psychogenic fugue) a dissociative disorder characterized by an episode in which an individual forgets his past, assumes a partial or complete new identity, and travels away from home or work, in some cases taking up a new name, occupation, and lifestyle. During the fugue, patients are unaware that they have forgotten anything and seem to other people to be behaving normally; following recovery, they recall nothing that happened during the fugue. The disorder is usually related to emotional conflicts due to some traumatic, stressful, or overwhelming event, remits spontaneously, and rarely recurs.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fugue

(fyūg),
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one for a period of time, often in a different city; afterward, the person has amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills, and procedural memory, are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fugue

(fyo͞og)
n.
Psychiatry A dissociative state, usually caused by trauma, marked by sudden travel or wandering away from home and an inability to remember one's past.

fu′gal (fyo͞o′gəl) adj.
fu′gal·ly adv.
fugue v.
fugu′ist (fyo͞o′gĭst) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Neurology A state in which the patient denies memory of activities for a period of hours to weeks; to external appearances, these activities were either completely normal or the patient disappeared and travelled extensively; most are functional; short fugues rarely occur in temporal lobe epilepsy
Psychiatry A state of personality dissociation characterised by amnesia and possibly physical flight from the customary environment or field of conflict
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

fugue

(fyūg)
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one, often in a different city; afterward, alleges amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

fugue

A rare psychological reaction to an intolerable situation in which the affected person wanders away from the old environment, apparently in a state of AMNESIA, and takes on a new identity, occupation and life. The loss of memory is selective and does not preclude use of the previous education. If there is recovery from the fugue, amnesia for the period of the fugue occurs.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Fugue

A dissociative experience during which a person travels away from home, has amnesia for their past, and may be confused about their identity but otherwise appear normal.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Commenting on her appointment, Dr Fuge said: "I am absolutely delighted to become Age Cymru's President.
She said Fuge, of previous good character, was recovering from cancer, having gone into remission in 2015, and also suffered from asthma.
On a first listening of the Grosse Fuge, I would submit, the melodic disjunction, chromaticism, and polyphonic textures test the limits of the appreciative ear even now.
Using his three examples of 'Maintaininge a fuge' she demonstrated his preference for overlapping entrances of canzona-like themes ('the sooner you bring in your parts the better it will show') as against longer subjects and double fugues.
After tricking the boy into a meeting, Simon Fuge then spent weeks buying him gifts - including sweets and a trip to the cinema - before performing a sex act on him.
So we are looking for a chair to build upon the successes that Meirion and his predecessor Dr Bernadette Fuge helped deliver, particularly with our influencing work and with our high media profile.
The subsequent later movements all delight, and feature the remarkable CBSO YouY th Chorus and soloists Keri Fuge and Rhian Lois - though why these two should precede Pike (her contribution huge compared with theirs) in the programme-booklet listings is a discourtesy which harks back to a far earlier age, when singers always took prominence.
133, Grosse Fuge that they play for fun in their spare time.
Heather Fuge, 42, of Weyhell Avenue, North Shields.
Birmingham Royal Ballet's Gross Fuge became gradually more sensuous as the musicians soared through Beethoven's searing string score - and the males stepped out of their skirts to reveal their tight belted shorts.