lobotomy

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lobotomy

 [lo-bot´ah-me]
a form of psychosurgery consisting of cutting of nerve fibers connecting a lobe of the brain with the thalamus. In most cases the affected parts are the prefrontal or frontal lobes, the areas of the brain involved with emotion; thus the operation is referred to as prefrontal or frontal lobotomy. Once fairly common as a method of controlling violent behavior, in recent decades its use has become rare because of the development of medications for treatment of severe mental illness, such as the antipsychotics that suppress violent symptoms of psychosis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lo·bot·o·my

(lō-bot'ŏ-mē),
1. Incision into a lobe.
2. Division of one or more nerve tracts in a lobe of the cerebrum.
[G. lobos, lobe, + tomē, a cutting]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lobotomy

(lə-bŏt′ə-mē, lō-)
n. pl. loboto·mies
Surgical incision into the frontal lobe of the brain to sever one or more nerve tracts, a technique formerly used to treat certain mental disorders but now rarely performed.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lo·bot·o·my

(lō-bot'ǒ-mē)
1. Incision into a lobe.
2. Division of one or more nerve tracts in a lobe of the cerebrum.
[G. lobos, lobe, + tomē, a cutting]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012