frog

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frog

(frog),
1. An amphibian in the order Anura, which includes the toads; the commonest frog genera are Rana (grass frogs) and Hyla (tree frogs).
2. In veterinary medicine, the spongy triangular cushion on the sole of the horse hoof that helps to absorb the shock of impact.
[A.S. frogge]

frog

(frôg, frŏg)
n.
1.
a. Any of numerous tailless aquatic, semiaquatic, or terrestrial amphibians of the order Anura, characteristically having a short vertebral column, a large head, long hind legs used for leaping, and a tadpole stage as larvae.
b. Any of various usually aquatic members of this order having smoother skin and longer hind legs than the toads.
2. A wedge-shaped, horny prominence in the sole of a horse's hoof.
3. Informal Hoarseness or phlegm in the throat.
French ROtoblator Group Study

frog

see ANURAN.
References in periodicals archive ?
Items include statements such as "If I had to list everything I felt grateful for, it would be a very long list" and "I am grateful to a wide variety of people." The GQ-6 has demonstrated adequate internal consistency and validity when correlated with other measures of gratitude (Froh et al., 2011).
The potential role of gratitude as a resilience factor is now being studied in educational environments (Bird & Maride, 2012; Froh, Bono, & Emmons, 2010; Ma, Kibler, & Sly, 2013), work-related contexts (Lanham, Rye, Rimsky, & Weill, 2012), health psychology (Ruini & Vescovelli, 2013), and clinical psychology (Huffman et al., 2014; Nelson, 2009).
Froh et al.'s [27] study included 89 children and adolescents, grades 3, 8, and 12, enrolled in a parochial school.
Kelly Froh is a comic artist and co-founder of Short Run comix and arts festival in Seattle.
Tambien, se encontraron relaciones significativas entre la gratitud y la satisfaccion con la experiencia escolar (Froh, Sefick & Emmons, 2008), y entre la valentia y la recuperacion de enfermedades fisicas y de trastornos psicologicos (Peterson, Park, & Seligman, 2005).
For example, studies conducted by Kashdan, Mishra, Breen and Froh (2009) inform that women consider the expression of gratitude as less complex, conflicting, uncertain, and more interesting and exciting than men.
Fundamentally, these criticisms focus on the following points: 1) many contents now claimed by positive psychology have been developed in previous decades by traditional psychology (Froh, 2004; Held, 2002; Lazarus, 2003; Linley et al., 2006; Ryff, 2003); 2) lack of scientific quality in positive psychology.