Friedman curve

par·to·gram

(par'tō-gram),
Graph of labor parameters of time and dilation with alert and action lines to prompt intervention if the curve deviates from expected.
[L. partus, childbirth, + -gram]

par·to·gram

(pahr'tō-gram)
Graph of labor parameters of time and dilation with alert and action lines to prompt intervention if the curve deviates from expected.
Synonym(s): Friedman curve, labor curve.
[L. partus, childbirth, + -gram]

Friedman,

Emanuel A., U.S. obstetrician, 1926–.
Friedman curve - a graph on which hours of labor are plotted against cervical dilation in centimeters.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus was born the "Friedman curve" that underpinned the decades-long dogma that women need to dilate about 1 cm/hr in the active phase of labor.
More recently, other data show that "the Friedman curve was really codified by the way we examined women every 2 hours.
When a patient reaches 8 cm of dilatation, remember the deceleration phase of the Friedman curve, and avoid starting Pitocin as a reaction to this phase.
And the long-accepted Friedman curve may not be an accurate description of normal labor progression, according to a new analysis of data from 1,329 nulliparous women aged 18-34 undergoing singleton, vertex presentation deliveries following spontaneous labor, said Dr.
Zhang said, pointing out that on his curve the average was 5.5 hours for progression from 4 cm to 10 cm, compared with 2.5 hours on the Friedman curve.
Their results demonstrate marked differences to the Friedman curve. They found the cervix dilated at a substantially slower rate in the active phase than Friedman's curve, taking twice as long to dilate from 4 to 10 cm (5.5 hrs versus 2.5hrs).
And the long-accepted Friedman curve may not be an accurate description of normal labor progression, according to a new study of data on 1,329 nulliparous women aged 18-34 undergoing singleton, vertex presentation deliveries following spontaneous labor, said Dr.
Zhang said, pointing out that on his curve the average time for progression from 4 cm to 10 cm was 5.5 hours, compared with 2.5 hours on the Friedman curve. "We also didn't see a deceleration phase," he said, noting that in 1978 Friedman modified his curve, but the distinctive sharp upturn remained, as did the deceleration phase.