friction

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friction

 [frik´shun]
the act of rubbing.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn),
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

friction

A soft tissue massage technique, which entails the use of small circular pressure strokes from the fingertips, thumb pads and palms, with the intent of mobilising stiff joints and enhancing the circulation of blood to tendons and ligaments.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn)
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another; especially rubbing the limbs of the body to aid the circulation.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
3. A group of movements in massage intended to move superficial layers over deeper structures, to reach deeper tissues, or to create heat. Includes static, cross-fiber, with-fiber, and circular frictions.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn)
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another; especially rubbing the limbs of the body to aid the circulation.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In the nonfinancial sectors of FRB/US, decisions by households and firms rest on forecasts of equilibrium goals that would be selected in the absence of frictions but, because of costs in adjusting activities, are only gradually achieved.
The restoration of equilibrium is subject to planning lags, contractual requirements, and other frictions that inhibit full adjustment to equilibrium within a quarter.
Although diagram 1 is useful in illustrating the difference between rapid adjustment to equilibrium in the absence of frictions and gradual adjustment to equilibrium when frictions are present, it does not directly indicate the way in which expectations of future goals influence dynamic adjustments under frictions.
Diagram 2 presents the intertemporal planning perspective of a profit-maximizing firm for which frictions are important constraints on actions.
Although in principle firms plan over an infinite future, the effective length of the planning period is determined by the extent of the frictions associated with the firm's actions.
A summary measure of the effective average length of the forward planning period is the mean lead determined by the relative-importance weights.(9) Because frictions play a large role in dynamic adjustments for capital equipment, the mean lead for equipment investment is relatively lengthy--approximately six quarters.
The coefficient of rubber friction (f) may be defined as:
De facto standard engineering equation for rubber friction forces
The present de facto standard engineering equation applicable to rubber friction calculations for dry conditions formulated by Kummer (ref.
[F.sub.Hb] = friction contribution from bulk deformation of the elastomer; and
2) 2008 literature review and analysis of rubber friction research went beyond the coefficient approach by focusing on the individual forces expressed in equation 2.