Freud

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Freud

 [froid]
Sigmund (1856–1939). Clinical neurologist and founder of psychoanalysis. Born in Freiberg in Moravia, and educated at the University of Vienna, he studied in Paris in 1885 under the neurologist J. M. Charcot, who encouraged him to investigate hysteria from a psychologic point of view. Freud stressed the existence of an unconscious that exerts a dynamic influence on consciousness, and was led to develop his method of “free association” in order to discover these buried memories. He emphasized the role of sexuality in the development of neurotic conditions, and published Interpretation of Dreams (1900), Psychopathology of Everyday Life (1901), and many more works. He was also director of the International Journal of Psychology. After fleeing the Nazi regime in Vienna in 1938, he died in London.

Freud

(froyd),
Sigmund, Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist, 1856-1939, founder of psychoanalysis. See: freudian, freudian fixation, freudian psychoanalysis, freudian slip, Freud theory.

Freud, Sigmund

[froid]
Etymology: Austrian neurologist, 1856-1939
founder of a complex integrated theory of psychological causes of mental disorders, some, such as hysteria, with physical symptoms. Among tenets of freudian theory are that human beings are motivated by a pleasure principle; receive internal stimulation from a sex instinct and a death instinct; have personality structures that can be divided into ego, superego, and id; and have unconscious, preconscious, and conscious levels of mental activity. See also freudian, freudian fixation, freudianism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most crucially, we get to see Anna Freud develop from an anxious and bookish young girl into an analyst and thinker.
WRITE STUFF Emma Freud and Love Actually writer Richard Curtis
This Americanized Freud was not singular, but multiple, his teachings recalibrated to the demands of a novel social and intellectual context.
Here, the Viennese, ever faithful to Freud, contended with heterodox Americans and Berliners who hoped to purge psychoanalysis of its founder's shadow.
Nonetheless, Freud delivered his lectures at Clark in German.
Although Freud was in his 50s by the time he spoke at Clark University, psychoanalysis was still in its infancy.
Neither of these world-premiere plays (nor, for that matter, two other recent dramas about Freud, Terry Johnson's Hysteria and Christopher Hampton's The Talking Cure) attempts to plumb the full, complex story of Freud's own backstory.
For prominent Chicago-based director Frank Galati (who has commandeered such memorable productions as The Grapes of Wrath and the musical Ragtime), the path leading to Freud began with an invitation from artistic head Libby Appel to direct Sophocles' Oedipus Rex at OSF.
The play builds toward a series of mini climaxes - Jung and Sabina's union, Freud and Jung's break, Jung and Sabina's break.
To the meditative intensity and polished craft of Tribute to Freud these letters add the cross-cutting immediacy, vivacity and detail of daily life caught on the wing in an era when international phone calls were an extravagance reserved for emergencies.
Freud will be joined by leaders in contemporary psychology for the series, called "Great Minds Come to Clark - Freud Revisited," which runs Oct.
In the final paragraphs, Freud emerges as a kind of cosmopolitan hero, one who was able to contemplate the scary notion that