freudian

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Related to Freudianism: Freudian psychology

freudian

 [froi´de-an]
1. pertaining to Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis or his psychological theories and method of psychotherapy (psychoanalytic theory and technique).
2. an adherent or user of freudian theory or methods.

freud·i·an

(froyd'ē-ăn),
Relating to or described by the Viennese psychiatrist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939).

Freudian

(froi′dē-ən)
adj.
Relating to or being in accordance with the psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud.
n.
A person who accepts the basic tenets of the psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud, especially a psychiatrist or psychologist who applies Freudian theory and method in conducting psychotherapy.

Freud′i·an·ism n.

freud·i·an

(froyd'ē-ăn)
Relating to or described by the Viennese psychiatrist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939).

Freud,

Sigmund, Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist, 1856-1939, founder of psychoanalysis.
Freud theory - a comprehensive theory of how personality is formed and develops in normal and emotionally disturbed individuals.
freudian - relating to or described by Freud.
freudian fixation
freudian psychoanalysis - the theory and practice of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy as developed by Freud.
freudian slip - a mistake in speech or deed which presumably suggests some underlying motive, often sexual or aggressive in nature.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Lunbeck deftly illuminates, Kohut's new discipline of "self psychology" epitomized the heterogeneity of late-20th century Freudianism, whose cultural prominence came at the expense of doctrinal purity.
The juxtaposition of hermeneutics and Freudianism was informed by Gadamer's insistence on the inadequacies of method and his prioritising of 'understanding as a dialogic, practical situated activity'(Stanford).
By my reference to elementary Freudian psychoanalysis, I do not mean the empirical scientific validity of Freudianism that has been rightly criticized in recent years.
Chan skillfully integrates the I-Ching, the history of computer science, Freudianism, the scholarship of Donna Haraway, and the writing of Sadie Plant into a satisfying exploration of how Chinese conceptualizations of technology help reconfigure traditionally patriarchal assumptions about technology's origin and role in Western society.
Three of the major strands of thought in the 20th century developed a version of the environmental model: Marxism, Freudianism, and social constructionism.
For example, it is tempting to feel that periods of psychiatric biologism a outrance are followed by hermeneutic rebellions (as it was the case of late 19thC neuropsychiatry and early 20thC Freudianism).
The name of Ernest Jones is not much heard these days, and yet he was as pivotal to the dissemination of psychoanalysis and Freudianism as T.H.
It is perhaps the Freudianism behind the fetish that leads Williams to pursue connections wherever they may lead, and although the results should be liberating, the lack of attention to primary meanings tends instead to instil anxiety.
That Peter Pan, the Alice books, and The Wonderful Wizard of Oz contain veiled elements of sexual awakening will surprise nobody remotely acquainted with the cracker-barrel Freudianism that has informed popular views of these books for decades.
While Cefalu makes the eminently reasonable claim that the psychoanalytic tradition of object-relations helps explain the conceptual limitations of Reformation moral theory, he unnecessarily and unpersuasively predicates this claim on a disavowal of what he refers to, with uncharacteristic amorphousness, as "Freudianism." Ignoring the exemplary work of William Kerrigan and more recent Lacanian-inflected work on psychoanalysis and early modern religious thought by Julia R.
The cartoonish, anti-Christian version of Western history has been out of favor with professional historians for some time, but it still shapes our perceptions and our language, much as Freudianism does.