Freudian theory


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Related to Freudian theory: Freudian slip, Jungian theory

Freudian theory

A set of propositions about human personality and behaviour derived from observations of patients engaged in FREE ASSOCIATION at a time in social history when the expression of sexuality was normally repressed. Such expression, often in symbolic form, convinced Freud that sex was at the basis of most psychopathology. He asserted that the uncovering of repressed unpleasant early experiences would disperse the psychopathology which he claimed they had caused. He proposed arbitrary divisions of the mind into SUPEREGO, EGO and ID. He asserted that infants pass though three stages-oral (birth to 18 months), anal (2–5 years) and phallic (5 years onward), and that the personality could be fixed at any of these stages with serious consequences, curable only by psychoanalysis. He proposed the OEDIPUS COMPLEX and the castration complex. Freud's ideas and discoveries continue to have wide influence, but are not now generally believed to have any scientific basis. There is little convincing evidence that the application of his theories in psychoanalysis has any specific value in the treatment of psychological disturbance.
References in periodicals archive ?
In "The Tyranny of the Text: Lawrence, Freud, and the Modernist Aesthetic," for example, Anne Fernihough writes, "Lawrence first encountered Freudian theory (in a diluted and perhaps distorted form) on meeting Frieda Weekley in 1912, and subsequently through discussions with Freudian analysts David Eder and Barbara Low in 1914" (48-49).
To begin with, because most social work practitioners are not as concerned about Freudian theory as Saari is, and operate on the basis of more holistic models, I doubt that her view of a rift between intrapsychic and social theories is widely shared.
Recognizing Freudian theory of subconscious as a paradigm shift in psychological understanding, Nienkamp begins Part II with the history of "self-deliberation" constructed by Chaim Perelman and Lucie Olbrechts-Tyteca as a particular case of argumentation.
Her analyses of Wagner's characters--and of his family--depend heavily on Freudian theory.
Psychoanalysts merged Freudian theory with Hindu conceptualizations to forge an alternative to the prescribed identity of the middle-class educated Babu.
Moreover, he sees current emphases in organizational research, such as multiple levels of analysis, images, symbols, myths, and emotions, as falling within the traditional purview of Freudian theory.
The psychiatric architects of NIMH had all been trained in Freudian theory and believed that there was a continuum between mental health and mental illness.
Finally, the appeal of primitivism found promotion through the misinterpretation of Freudian theory.
17 John Hospers observed in 1959 that Freudian theory allows one to view "with a certain detached and half-humorous unconcern the feelings and foibles which it would make most philosophers squirm to have mentioned.
In Freud and the Bolsheviks, Miller sets forth in readable prose the birth, death, and resurrection of Freudian theory in Russia.
If the self doesn't experience itself in immediate self-proximity but instead realizes things about itself only belatedly, as the Freudian theory suggests, the implications for subjectivity are significant.
1) Scheffler and Deigh concur in thinking that although Freudian theory doesn't entirely solve the problem, it can nevertheless contribute to a solution.