French paradox


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Related to French paradox: resveratrol
A term referring to the decreased incidence of coronary heart disease in the French, which is attributed to increased alcohol consumption, as well as a more relaxed lifestyle and lack of snacking between meals

French paradox

An informal term for the unexplained fact that, in spite of a national diet characterized by a high fat and cholesterol intake, the French enjoy almost the lowest incidence of coronary heart disease in Europe. Possible explanations include the antioxidant effect of FLAVONOID substances in red wine and the protective effect of olive oil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Within the limited space of this article, we will not solve the mystery of the French paradox but rather the intent is to provide information and let you decide whether or not to add "cuisine Francoise" to your daily routine.
Originally, much of the discussion regarding the purported health benefits of alcohol consumption revolved around the so-called "French Paradox." Among developed countries, the French have low rates of chronic heart disease relative to their per capita consumption of saturated fats.
Thus, a third answer to our original question on the French paradox would be that the end of the road does indeed appear to be drawing closer for France.
An epidemiological link between the reduction of cardiovascular mortality and moderate wine consumption in French and Mediterranean adults, known as the "French paradox" [1], has attracted the steady interest of medicobiological researchers over the past two decades.
The findings could provide clues to the "French paradox" and explain why people who live in the country enjoy good health despite favouring a diet high in saturated fat.
Cambridge biotech firm Lycotec believes these could be the "missing piece in the French paradox puzzle".
The French Paradox is that they eat what they want in small portions and so stay thin.
In fact, Israel predicts that compelling data on vitamin K's beneficial effects on the immune system, bone health and mass, and cardiovascular health will make it "the next vitamin D." And resveratrol, found in peanuts and red wine grapes, is intriguing because of its association with the "French paradox" -- relatively low levels of heart disease and cancer in a population in which high-fat diets and smoking are not uncommon.
Two recent studies (7,8) have shed some light on the French Paradox or "Is alcohol beneficial or harmful with regards CAD?" While the effects of chronic ethanol consumption on liver have been well studied and documented, its effect on the cardiovascular system is bimodal.
Their surprising slimness and youthful looking skin despite their diet is often referred to as the 'French Paradox'.
One clue that may help explain this "French paradox" is their frequent consumption of grapes and in various forms.
There's something so similar to the French Paradox: the French eat foods that are rich and heavy yet never yielding the same fat content as other cuisines.