free flap

(redirected from Free tissue transfer)

flap

 [flap]
1. a mass of tissue for grafting, usually including skin, only partially removed from one part of the body so that it retains its own blood supply during transfer to another site.
2. an uncontrolled movement.
advancement flap sliding flap.
axial pattern flap a myocutaneous flap containing an artery in its long axis.
free flap an island flap detached from the body and reattached at the distant recipient site by microvascular anastomosis.
island flap a flap consisting of skin and subcutaneous tissue, with a pedicle made up of only the nutrient vessels.
jump flap one cut from the abdomen and attached to a flap of the same size on the forearm. The forearm flap is transferred later to some other part of the body to fill a defect there.
myocutaneous flap a compound flap of skin and muscle with adequate vascularity to permit sufficient tissue to be transferred to the recipient site. See also axial pattern flap and random pattern flap.
pedicle flap a flap consisting of the full thickness of the skin and the subcutaneous tissue, attached by tissue through which it receives its blood supply. Called also pedicle graft.
random pattern flap a myocutaneous flap with a random pattern of arteries, as opposed to an axial pattern flap.
rope flap tube flap.
rotation flap a local pedicle flap whose width is increased by having the edge distal to the defect form a curved line; the flap is then rotated and a counterincision is made at the base of the curved line, which increases the mobility of the flap.
skin flap a full-thickness mass or flap of tissue containing epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue.
sliding flap a flap carried to its new position by a sliding technique; called also advancement flap.
tube flap (tubed pedicle flap) a bipedicle flap made by elevating a long strip of tissue from its bed except at the two extremities, the cut edges then being sutured together to form a tube.

free flap

flap in which the donor vessels are divided, the tissue is transported to another area, and the flap is revascularized by anastomosis of vessels in the recipient bed to the artery and vein(s) of the flap.

free flap

Reconstructive surgery An autologous tissue flap with anastomosed blood vessels

free flap

(frē flap)
Island flap in which the donor vessels are severed proximally, the flap is transported as a free object to the recipient area, and the flap is revascularized by anastomosing its supplying vessels to vessels there.

Free flap

A section of tissue detached from its blood supply, moved to another part of the body, and reattached by microsurgery to a new blood supply.
Mentioned in: Breast Reconstruction
References in periodicals archive ?
Care focuses on complex wounds, replants, grafts, flaps, free tissue transfer, use of implantable materials and the healing process and response.
The immediate or delayed reconstructive choices varied from skin graft to bioengineered dermal substitutes, to more complex state of the art free tissue transfer, and more elegant options such as deep tissues-sparing perforator flaps.
In the time immediately after free tissue transfer, the flap depends solely on microvascular anastomosis of the pedicle vessels to the recipient vessels for its blood supply.
TUESDAY, May 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with a fibula free tissue transfer (FFTT) for osteoradionecrosis (ORN) and osteonecrosis (ON) of the mandible, the rate of complications is similar for patients undergoing primary and secondary dental implantation, according to a study published online May 3 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.
Objective: To determine the outcomes of free tissue transfer for large scalp and forehead defects reconstruction.
Other chapters address fracture fixation techniques, free tissue transfer, and limb-threatening emergencies.
Numerous techniques to reconstruct upper limb defects have previously been described which includes locoregional flaps, [9,10] distant flaps [1,11] and free tissue transfer. [1,9,12-15] Each reconstructive option depends on the institution and is individualised to the patient and type of defect.
Extensive scalp reconstruction after repeated failure of free tissue transfer with a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap.
When a simple closure is not possible, a skin graft, pedicled tissue transfer, and free tissue transfer can be used for covering the exposed bone.
Several therapeutic approaches have been published, including prosthetic obturators, nonvascularised grafts, local flaps, regional flaps and free tissue transfer.13,14
Combined Revascularization and Microvascular Free Tissue Transfer for Limb Salvage: A Six-Year Experience.