Sanger, Frederick

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Sanger, Frederick

(1918-) English biochemist who carried out extensive research into protein structure and determined the amino acid sequence of insulin, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1958. He also developed methodology for DNA SEQUENCING and determined the entire nucleotide sequence of a viral DNA for which he shared a second Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1980.

Sanger,

Frederick, English biochemist and twice Nobel laureate, 1918–.
Sanger method - sequencing of DNA by employing an enzyme that can polymerase DNA and labeled nucleotides.
Sanger reagent - Synonym(s): fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene
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En 1958 le fue otorgado a Frederick Sanger su primer Premio Nobel de Quimica "por su trabajo en la estructura de proteinas, particularmente de la insulina", pues su trabajo de investigacion llego a la conclusion principal de que las dos cadenas polipeptidicas de la insulina tenia secuencias de aminoacidos precisos y, por extension, que cada proteina tenia una secuencia unica.
Dr Frederick Sanger, one of the greatest research pioneers: born Rendcomb 13 August 1918; married 1940 Margaret Joan Howe; (two sons, Robin and Peter, and a daughter, Sally Joan); died 19 November 2013.
Its researchers invented the science of molecular biology beginning with Frederick Sanger's Nobel Prize work on sequencing proteins and Watson and Crick's discovery of the DNA basis of the genetic code.
In 2003, 454 Life Sciences sequenced the adenovirus genome in less than one day and submitted the completed sequence to GenBank, becoming the first to develop a new method and to successfully complete a whole genome sequence since Walter Gilbert and Frederick Sanger won the Nobel Prize in 1980 for the invention of DNA sequencing.
The timeline arguably dates back to 1955, the year a Nobel Prize-winning British biochemist named Frederick Sanger first sequenced the protein bovine insulin.
The only others to have received more than one Nobel Prize are Marie Curie (Physics 1903, Chemistry 1911), Linus Pauling (Chemistry 1954, Peace 1962), John Bardeen (Physics 1956, 1972), Frederick Sanger (Chemistry 1958, 1980) and the UN High Commission for Refugees (Peace 1954, 1981).
Frederick Sanger's DNA sequencing technique of 1977 has been upgraded and is widely used today.