low molecular weight heparin

(redirected from Fraxiparine)

low mo·lec·u·lar weight hep·a·rin

(LMWH) (lō mŏ-lek'yŭ-lăr wāt hep'ăr-in)
A form of heparin with a longer half life and fewer adverse effects (e.g., thrombocytopenia).

low molecular weight heparin

Abbreviation: LMWH
The most bioavailable fraction of heparin. It has a more precise anticoagulant effect than unfractionated heparins and is used to prevent and treat deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and acute coronary syndromes.

CAUTION!

It should be used selectively, if at all, in patients with reduced kidney function.
See also: heparin
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients were treated with low molecular weight heparin (Fraxiparine, Aspen Notre Dame de Bondeville, France), with the addition of anticoagulation therapy in cases of a platelet count increase at > 500 x 10 (9)/L.
GSK, which holds an 18.6% stake in Aspen, will continue to distribute and market the Arixtra and Fraxiparine brands under licence in Indonesia.
Perioperative antibiotics (Kefzol 1 gram i.v.) and antithrombotics (Fraxiparine 0.3 mL i.m.) were used.
Yu et al., "Significantly inhibitory effects of low molecular weight heparin (Fraxiparine) on the motility of lung cancer cells and its related mechanism," Tumor Biology, vol.
The patient was administered antihypertensive (Methyldopa 250mg tablets, three times a day), anti-coagulants (Fraxiparine 2850UI/0.3ml sol.
Additionally, diltiazem, fraxiparine, iron preparations i.v.
Initial therapeutic approaches included low-molecular-weight-heparin-calcium (fraxiparine) by subcutaneous injection, protection of gastric mucosa, reduction of intracranial pressure, and fluid infusion.
M2 EQUITYBITES-December 31, 2013-Aspen closes buy of Arixtra, Fraxiparine commercial operations
* Backward integration: The Merck site manufactures, among other things, heparin, which is needed to produce another drug, Fraxiparine, which Aspen intends to acquire from GSK.
Efficacy and tolerance of fraxiparine in the prevention of deep vein thrombosis in general surgery performed with medullar conduction anesthesia.
Agnelli said the investigators chose nadroparin (Fraxiparine) because it has been used for more than 25 years and is made by an Italian company that agreed to provide it for the study.