Frankenfood


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Frankenfood

A popular, generic term of uncertain utility for any food product produced by recombinant DNA technology (e.g., the genetically engineered tomato); fanicifully named after Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

ge·net·i·cal·ly mod·i·fied food

(jĕ-net'ik-ă-lē mod'i-fīd fūd)
Scientifically altered foodstuffs intended to limit exposure of the plants or animals to disease or spoilage. Concerns about safety and efficacy have been raised worldwide.
Synonym(s): frankenfood.
References in periodicals archive ?
The activists didn't light torches, but they did picket 100 theaters showing the film while passing out fliers that depicted a dinosaur pushing a grocery basket labeled "Bio-tech Frankenfoods."
Additionally, the term Frankenfood was the least used in the study with only one mention.
On Lewis's account, within this foodscape the eater is a passive spectator of simulated "Frankenfood," constrained in her ability to enact an effective revolt or to achieve alimentary freedom.
Celeb chef Eric Greenspan will host Frankenfood, a culinary competish in which home cooks try to get their dishes on a restaurant's menu.
The contributors are both historical and more contemporary, including: Immanuel Kant on the moral worth of rational beings, Peter Singer's utilitarian defense of animal liberation, Bill McKibben on over-population and over-consumption, Garrett Hardin on "the tragedy of the commons", and Jonathan Rauch on whether "frankenfood" can save the planet.
This is frankenfood from a genetic experiment gone awry.
Terms like "Frankenfood" made for good sound bites, but were not based on reality.
Miller, the author of The Frankenfood Myth, is a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, and was an official at the US National Institutes of Health and at the Food and Drug Administration from 1977-1994.
His most recent book, The Frankenfood Myth: How Protest and Politics Threaten the Biotech Revolution (co-authored with Gregory Conko), was selected by Barron's as one the 25 Best Books of 2004.
Additionally, the search costs for most consumers to find neutral information is very high, as there are contradictory messages describing GM food as "food to feed the planet," as well as "Frankenfood" [see, e.g., Gates (2001)].