Francisella


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Related to Francisella: Brucella

Francisella

 [fran″sĭ-sel´ah]
a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, coccoid or rod-shaped bacteria; F. tularen´sis (formerly called Pasteurella tularensis) is the etiologic agent of tularemia.

Francisella

(fran-si-sel'lă),
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming, aerobic bacteria that contain small, gram-negative cocci and rods. Capsules are rarely produced and the cells may show bipolar staining. These organisms are highly pleomorphic; they do not grow on plain agar or in liquid media without special enrichment; they are pathogenic and cause tularemia in humans. The type species is Francisella tularensis.

Francisella

/Fran·ci·sel·la/ (fran″sĭ-sel´ah) a genus of microorganisms, including F. (Pasteurella) tularen´sis, the etiologic agent of tularemia.

Francisella

a genus of nonmotile nonspore-forming gram-negative aerobic bacteria that is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages. Frequently found in natural waters, it can be parasitic in humans, other mammals, birds, and arthropods. The organism causes tularemia in humans.

Fran·ci·sel·la

(fran-si-sel'lă)
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming, aerobic bacteria that contain small, gram-negative cocci and rods. Capsules are rarely produced, and the cells may show bipolar staining. These organisms are highly pleomorphic; they do not grow on plain agar or in liquid media without special enrichment; they are pathogenic and cause tularemia in humans. The type species is F. tularensis.

Fran·ci·sel·la

(fran-si-sel'lă)
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming, aerobic bacteria that are pathogenic and cause tularemia in humans.

Francisella

a genus of very small gram-negative bacteria.

Francisella tularensis
biotype A (F. tularensis biovar tularensis) is the etiological agent of tularemia; biotype B (F. tularensis biovar holarctica (palaearctica)) is less virulent. Formerly called Pasteurella tularensis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Soil sampling: Approximately 250-300 grams of soil sample was taken from Francisella tularensis positive (n=74) and negative (n=74) sites (unpublished data) using a portable electronic weighing balance (Mughal, Pakistan).
In the 2007 and 2008 exercises, 3 category A organisms were provided to participating laboratories: Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain), Yersinia pestis (CDC A1122 devoid of the 75-kb low-calcium response virulence plasmid), and Francisella tularensis (live vaccine strain; includes NDBR 101 lots, TSI-GSD lots, and ATCC 29684).
Molecular method for discrimination between Francisella tularensis and Francisella-like endosymbionts.
Identification and characterization of Francisella species from natural warm springs in Utah, USA.
Gerec ve Yontemler: Lenfadenopati sikayeti ile basvurup mikroaglutinasyon testinde Francisella tularen-sis antikor titresi 1/160 ve ustunde olan 16 olgu geriye donuk olarak incelendi.
The NIAID funding covers development, manufacturing and clinical research activities to prepare TP-271, discovered and patented by Tetraphase, for further development against biothreat agents, including Francisella tularnesis, which causes tularemia, Yersinia pestis, which causes bubonic plague, and Bacillus anthracis, which causes anthrax disease, as well as bacterial pathogens associated with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.
Infectious agents that can be passed from cats to humans through bites or scratches include: Bartonella (cat-scratch disease), Capnocytophaga (a bacterium found in cats' saliva that can cause life-threatening illness in humans when introduced into the bloodstream), Mycoplasma felis (a bacterium responsible for chronic infections), Pasteurella multocida (a bacterium that causes severe infection), Francisella tularensis (an organism that causes tularemia, a disease so severe it was once being developed as a bioweapon), Yersinia pestis (the likely cause of the plague that killed more than 100 million people in the sixth century and five million more in the 14th century), and, of course, the rabies virus.
The agents most likely to be used as weapons in the commission of an act of bioterrorism include variola major (smallpox), Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), Yersinia pestis (plague), Francisella tularensis (tularemia), Brucella species (brucellosis), and Clostridium botulinum intoxication (botulism).
If systemic symptoms, such as fever or myalgias, occur in a normal host, the infection is probably due to something other than sporotrichosis, such as Francisella tularensis.
Tularemia is caused by exposure to Francisella tularensis bacteria, which affect both animals and people.